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Golf Rule 32, Bogey Par And Stableford Competitions

Simplified Rules

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  • Note: Bogey, par and Stableford are competitions played under the stroke play format, with each player competing against a fixed score for each hole. The player with the most “wins” during the competition is the winner, as in match play.

In bogey (or par) competition, the object is to beat a score of bogey (or par) on as many holes as possible.

  • Example: Maurice scores a net 5 on the first hole, a par 5. In bogey competition, he would “win” the hole and go 1-up; in par competition, he would earn a halve and be all square. At round’s end, Maurice has 6 wins and 3 losses for an aggregate total of 3-up.

In Stableford competition, a point value is assigned for different scores on a hole (e.g., birdie, par, bogey). The player with the highest point total wins.

32-1. Stroke play rules apply to bogey, par and Stableford competitions, except where the rules are at odds with the specific rules in this section. If handicaps are being used, the player with the lowest net score on a hole (gross score minus any handicap strokes) has honors on the next tee.

In scoring bogey and par competitions, any hole on which no score is recorded is considered a loss. The player loses any hole on which he breaks Rule 4 (Clubs), Rule 6-4 (Caddie) or any local rule or condition of competition that carries a maximum per-round penalty. Any player not reporting a rules violation is disqualified.

A competitor who breaks Rule 6-3a (Time of Starting) by showing up late, but is on the tee and ready within five minutes of his tee time, is penalized with the loss of one hole on his total. The same applies if a player breaks Rule 6-7 (Undue Delay; Slow Play).

Stableford competitions are scored under the following point system:

Triple eagle (4-under par on a hole) – 6 points; double eagle – 5 points; eagle – 4 points; birdie – 3 points; par – 2 points; bogey – 1 point; double bogey or worse – 0 points.

A player who breaks any rule that carries a maximum per-round penalty must report the violation before turning in his scorecard; otherwise, he’s disqualified. When such a violation is reported, two points are deducted for each hole on which he broke the rule, up to a maximum of four points per round for each rule broken.

A competitor who breaks Rule 6-3a (Time of Starting) by showing up late, but is on the tee and ready within five minutes of his tee time, loses two points from his total. The same applies if a player breaks Rule 6-7 (Undue Delay; Slow Play).

The tournament committee can set pace-of-play guidelines imposing maximum times to play a shot, hole or round. In this case, a first violation brings a one-point penalty; a second violation earns an additional two-point penalty; a third violation results in disqualification.

32-2. Disqualification under any of these rules means disqualification from a bogey, par or Stableford competition: Rule 1-3 (Agreement to Waive Rules), Rule 3-4 (Refusal to Comply with a Rule), Rule 4 (Clubs), Rule 5-1 or 5-2 (the Ball), Rule 6-2b (Handicap), Rule 6-3 (Time of Starting and Groups), Rule 6-4 (Caddie), Rule 6-6b (Signing and Returning Score Card), Rule 6-6d (Wrong Score for Hole, unless the violation doesn’t change the result of the hole), Rule 6-7 (Undue Delay; Slow Play), Rule 6-8 (Discontinuance of Play), Rule 7-1 (Practice Before or Between Rounds), Rule 11-1 (Teeing), Rule 14-3 (Artificial Devices, Unusual Equipment and Unusual Use of Equipment), Rule 22-1 (Ball Assisting Play), or Rule 33-7 (Disqualification Penalty Imposed by Committee).

In all other instances where breaking a rule would bring disqualification, the player is only DQ’d for that particular hole.

32-1. Conditions Bogey, par and Stableford competitions are forms of stroke play in which play is against a fixed score at each hole. The Rules for stroke play, so far as they are not at variance with the following specific Rules, apply.

In handicap bogey, par and Stableford competitions, the competitor with the lowest net score at a hole takes the honor at the next teeing ground.

a. Bogey and Par Competitions The scoring for bogey and par competitions is made as in match play.

Any hole for which a competitor makes no return is regarded as a loss. The winner is the competitor who is most successful in the aggregate of holes.

The marker is responsible for marking only the gross number of strokes for each hole where the competitor makes a net score equal to or less than the fixed score.

par bogey golf competition

b. Stableford Competitions

The winner is the competitor who scores the highest number of points.

The marker is responsible for marking only the gross number of strokes at each hole where the competitor’s net score earns one or more points.

32-2. Disqualification Penalties

a. From the Competition b. For a Hole In all other cases where a breach of a Rule would result in disqualification, the competitor is disqualified only for the hole at which the breach occurred.

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Par/bogey format.

A par competition ( par / bogey competition) is a form of Stroke Play where the scoring is made as in 18- hole Match Play . The golfer plays a match against par on every hole (a virtual scratch golfer who plays pars at all holes). The opponent is the player’s potential and there are only three outcomes for each hole : Win, Halve or Loss. The points are awarded in relation to the par (or bogey ) at each hole as follows:

stableford points, par bogey points, par/bogey

The table shows a comparison of points scored in the Par / Bogey format with Stableford scoring .

A bogey competition is the variation of the classic par competition. The only difference is that the golfer plays against “ bogey ” on every hole . In this competition “ bogey ” does not necessarily mean one over par and its value is determined by Committee for each hole . It is normally the same as the par score, occasionally it is a shot higher. Some more traditional clubs have par and bogey scores for each hole on their scorecards.

Points in these formats can be counted in relation to the net par value or the gross par value. In handicap competitions ( net score ) players have to know and allocate their handicap strokes to each hole .  Net score page shows more information about the allocation of handicap strokes.

The side  with the highest total number of points scored on all holes wins.

See simple Stroke Play and Par/Bogey Competition score calculator here.

The complete, universal stroke play scorecard (including Par/Bogey scoring)

that calculates the net Stroke Play and Par / Bogey score of the entire round of golf.

Menu path: Golf » Scoring » Stroke Play » Par/Bogey Format

update: December 2023

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Golf Rule 32: Bogey, par and stableford competitions

Don't understand how stableford works then check out this article to find out.

Ed Greenland's picture

Rule 32: Bogey, par and stableford competitions

One of the official 34 Rules of Golf.

par bogey golf competition

Bogey Golf: The Ultimate Strategy on How to Play Bogey Golf

bogey golf tips how to be a bogey golfer

Bogey golf is when you score one more than the posted par score on a golf hole. For some amateur golfers, it’s a real accomplishment!

This article will cover bogey golf and how to be a bogey golfer. Keep scrolling below for specific tips on how to be a better bogey golfer off your drive, approach, and on the green.

Remember, you can’t score par until you know how to bogey!

Key Takeaways

  • Bogey golf involves scoring one stroke over par on each hole, a great accomplishment for amateur golfers.
  • Double, triple, and quadruple bogeys indicate higher scores above par and should be minimized.
  • The term ‘bogey’ originated in Scotland and England in the late 1800s, representing golf’s original ‘par’ score.
  • A bogey golfer’s handicap score is 90, which many golfers find satisfactory.
  • To play bogey golf, focus on hitting straight woods and irons and only putt a maximum of two times per hole.

Table of Contents

What is a bogey in golf.

A bogey in golf is shooting one stroke over what the par on that individual hole is.

  • On a par 3, a bogey is a score of 4.
  • On a par 4, a bogey is a score of 5.
  • On a par 5, a bogey is a score of 6.

Is Bogey Golf Good?

A bogey is not a bad score in the game of golf. For lots of casual golfers, bogey golf is a great goal!

Golf is a challenging sport to learn. If you are starting out, shooting one stroke over a particular hole’s par rating is a great accomplishment. Most golfers are content to be bogey golfers!

bogey golf scorecard

What is a Double Bogey in Golf?

On top of just a regular bogey, a double bogey means shooting two strokes over that hole’s par rating.

  • On a par 3, a double bogey is a score of 5
  • On a par 4, a double bogey is a score of 6
  • On a par 5, a double bogey is a score of 7

For most regular golfers, a double bogey is easily achievable. You can hit one or two bad shots and still save a double bogey score.

Is Double Bogey Golf Good?

Double bogey golf, where a player averages a score of two over par on each hole, isn’t considered as proficient as bogey golf. However, it is still a reasonable standard of play for many weekend golfers and beginners.

Double bogey golf represents a stage in a golfer’s development where they are still learning the game’s nuances and improving their skills. While there’s room to grow from a double bogey standard, achieving this level of play can still offer a satisfying and enjoyable golfing experience.

Remember, the most important part of golf is to enjoy playing the game, and as long as you are doing that, you’re doing great.

What is a Triple Bogey in Golf? Quadruple Bogey?

Triple bogey and quadruple bogey are other scores in golf and mean exactly as they sound.

  • A triple bogey means shooting three strokes over par.
  • A quadruple bogey means shooting four strokes over par.

These scores are worse than just a regular or double bogey and will quickly increase your score on the scorecard.

Below, we will review a few things you can do as a golfer to limit double bogeys and these other higher scores.

Birdie, Eagle, and Albatross

If you are lucky enough to score under par on a hole, you’ll need to understand what a birdie, eagle, and an albatross is.

  • A birdie means shooting one stroke under a hole’s par rating.
  • An eagle means shooting two strokes under par.
  • An albatross means shooting three strokes under par (usually a 2 on a par 5)!

These scores are really good because they help to offset bogeys that you get on other holes.

What does the word bogey mean?

“bogey” originated in Scotland and England in the late 1800s. It was slang related to the quest for finding the “bogey man” being as hard as getting a perfect score on a golf hole.

When scoring criteria were first introduced on British golf courses, bogey represented the result that the best players were expected to achieve on each hole.

As the game evolved, so did the scoring measures and terms used to describe them. Eventually, all golf courses moved this route, with the bogey showing one stroke above the expected result on each hole.

Is scoring a bogey in golf bad?

It depends on your skill level out on the golf course.

For professional golfers, known as a scratch golfer , getting a bogey is typically considered a bad score. Professional golfers aim to shoot under par, meaning a bogey adds more strokes to their score than they would like.

Only a small percentage of golfers are scratch golfers, so this only applies to a few.

For amateur golfers, a bogey can be viewed as an average to a good score, depending on the hole and how challenging the golf course is.

A bogey can be considered a great score for recreational golfers.

Golf is a challenging sport to pick up and learn. If you can hit the ball consistently to get within one stroke over par, you can consider that a success.

Golf Accessories Every Bogey Golfer Should Have

To play better golf, there are a few key accessories that we think all bogey golfers should invest in:

  • Golf Shoes : Proper shoes (spiked or spikeless) give you extra traction on the golf course, which helps you hit more solid golf shots.
  • Golf Glove : Like your shoes, proper gloves prevent your hands from slipping on your golf club’s grip. This will help you hit more solid shots.
  • Golf GPS or Watch : To be better at golf, you must know how far you can hit each club. A golf GPS watch or rangefinder will help you dial in your distances and help you pick the right club for each situation.

Shop some of the top golf accessories for bogey golfers below. Click here to view tons of other gifts for golfers .

FootJoy Men's FJ Fuel Golf Shoe, White/Black/Orange, 11

A Bogey Golfer’s Average Golf Score

If you finish with a bogey score at the end of 18 holes, your average score will be 90.

Ask yourself:

Would you be happy if you had a score of 90 on a golf round?

How To Play Bogey Golf

If you are looking to score lower , you first need to master how play bogey golf off the tee, on your approach, pitching, chipping, and putting.

If you aim to play bogey golf, your tee shot becomes critical. Before your shot, you will want to check out the fairway and decide which side of the fairway would be best to land on for a better approach shot into the green.

If the hole is a dogleg left or right, it will make sense to try and get the best view at the green without any obstacles or trees in the way.

This plays the same for a par 3. Look at where the hole is located on the green, then decide which side of the green you want to aim at. This will give you the best look at your second shot.

As a bogey golfer, it is important that your tee shot lands in the fairway or light rough so that you can hit a pure approach shot.

To improve your tee shot, watch this video below! It helped me save strokes off of the tee box.

TOP 5 DRIVER GOLF TIPS - IMPORTANT DO'S & DON'TS!

Approach Shot

Once you have your ball on the fairway (or not), you have to aim your approach shot and decide where to attempt to land the ball on the green. Take a look at where the flag is located.

At most golf courses, there is some indicator on the flagstick to tell you if it is situated in the green’s front, middle, or back.

Another helpful tip I’ve found is to club up on your irons. In most cases, clubbing up will help remove the slope and wind that may be a factor in the course. It also should ensure that you have enough club to get up to the green and past the hole, leaving you an easy chip back near the pin.

You want your approach shot straight towards the hole so that even if you are short or deep, you have a clear next shot.

Pitching and Chipping

When up near the green, you must be careful with pitching and chipping to limit yourself to a bogey.

One helpful tip is that if you can putt the ball from off the green, you should.

If you need to chip, always watch the ball. Place the ball back in your stance and let the wedge’s loft get underneath to pop the ball up and toward your target.

You don’t want to be super aggressive because that will have you sending the ball way past the hole. You will often want to use your pitching or approach wedge , which has the perfect loft for these types of shots.

The goal is to get the ball to stop as close to the hole as possible.

To be a bogey golfer, it is important that you never putt more than two times on the green on a single hole. This will limit the number of strokes you add to your scorecard when you play golf .

To limit your putts, you need to master your putting weight. You don’t want to be super aggressive because that will have you putting way past the hole. Try to read the slope rating of the green as best as possible.

If you are on the green in regulation, you will also have a great look to score par with a two-putt.

how to play bogey golf putting

What is a Bogey Golf Handicap?

A bogey golf handicap refers to a handicap of 18 for a standard 18-hole course. This is calculated based on the idea that the golfer will make a bogey, or one over par, on each hole.

According to the United States Golf Association , a bogey golfer is considered a golfer with a course handicap of 20 on a course of standard difficulty. You usually shoot about 20 strokes over the golf course’s par.

If you were to bogey every hole on the golf course, you would be 18 over par. This does equate to an 18 handicap, but several other factors are also taken into consideration.

It is a clear sign of a golfer who has moved beyond beginner status and can maintain a consistent playstyle over the course of a round.

Most amateurs would be happy averaging a bogey per hole, but would you?

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What is a bogey on golf.

In golf, a bogey is a score of one stroke over par on a particular hole.

What is a birdie, bogey, and eagle in golf?

In golf, a birdie is a score of one stroke under par on a hole, a bogey is a score of one stroke over par on a hole, and an eagle is a score of two strokes under par on a hole.

Is a bogey better than a birdie?

No, a birdie is better than a bogey in golf as it is a score of one stroke under par while a bogey is a score of one stroke over par

Is bogey worse than par?

Yes, bogey is worse than par in golf as it means taking one more stroke than the set par for a particular hole.

What’s worse than a bogey in golf?

In golf, a double bogey is worse than a bogey, which means taking two more strokes than the set par for a particular hole.

What is 18 holes of golf called?

In golf, playing a full round of golf consisting of 18 holes is called a “round of golf.”

What are bad golfers called?

There is no specific term for bad golfers, but sometimes the term “hackers” or “duffers” is used.

What does E stand for in golf score?

In golf, “E” stands for “even,” which means the golfer has completed a hole or a round with a score that is equal to par.

What is the purpose of a golf handicap?

The purpose of a golf handicap is to allow golfers of different skill levels to compete fairly against each other. The handicap system adjusts a golfer’s score based on their skill level, so that they can compete on an even playing field with other golfers.

Ryan William

Ryan William

With over 25 years hands-on experience in the golfing world, Ryan is not just an avid golfer but a topical authority. His journey has had him delve deep into the nuances of the sport, from mastering the swing to understanding new golf technology. As an entrepreneur, Ryan is at the forefront of the latest golf trends, reviewing all new clubs, accessories, and training aids. His insights and expertise are backed by a prolific writing career, with over 1000 articles published across various platforms. Ryan's commitment is clear: to guide and inform the golf community with unparalleled knowledge and passion.

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Golf Scoring Terms (Par, Bogey, Birdie, Eagle, Albatross, and More)

Last Updated on June 16, 2023

Golf Scoring Terms (Par, Bogey, Birdie, Eagle, Albatross, and More)

We've compiled a list of 100+  golf terms  that are useful to know, but the  golf scoring terms  we'll cover in this guide are among the most essential when you're out on the course or watching televised golf.

Golf Scoring Terms Cheat Sheet

Golf scoring terms explained.

Stroke -  In golf, a "Stroke" is any forward club swing, including when putting, that a golfer is trying to hit the ball. 

You can essentially use "Stroke" as a synonym for a shot/putt, but keep in mind that it also includes "whiffs" if you miss the ball when trying to hit it.

Par - " Par " is the number of strokes that an expert or " scratch golfer " is expected to need to complete a hole. 

Par always includes two putts for each hole. On a par-4 hole, a scratch golfer is supposed to reach the green in two strokes, then complete the hole with two putts.

Distance, or more specifically "effective distance" (the distance a hole plays after accounting for whether it's uphill/downhill, its elevation, etc.), is the main determining factor in a hole's par rating.

Here are the USGA 's distance guidelines for men:

  • Par-3 –  Up to 250 yards
  • Par-4 –  251 to 470 yards
  • Par-5 –  401 to 690 yards

For women, the USGA’s distance guidelines are:

  • Par-3 –  Up to 210 yards
  • Par-4 –  211 to 400 yards
  • Par-5 –  401 to 575 yards

The golf scoring term "Par" is also used to reference the combined par of a group of golf holes.

Full-length 18-hole golf courses include par-3, par-4, and par-5 holes. "Course Par" for the 18 holes will usually be between 69-73, with par-72 being most common for an 18-hole golf course.

Par can also be used for multiple rounds of golf. In the PGA tour, tournaments are usually played over four days, with 18 holes being played each day.

On a par-72 golf course, par for four rounds is 288. On leaderboards and television graphics, you'll usually be shown a professional golfers score relative to par for all holes played thus far in all days of the tournament. Sometimes their scores for individual rounds will also be shown or discussed.

Under Par -  The term "under par" describe a player's score when they've taken fewer strokes than par up to a given point of the golf course.

If a player took 3 strokes to complete a par-3, 3 strokes to complete a par-4, and 4 strokes to complete a par-5 hole, their score could be described as "two under par" or "-2".

par bogey golf competition

Over Par -  The term "over par" can describe a player's score relative to par when they've taken more strokes than par.

If a player took 4 strokes to complete a par-3, 6 strokes to complete a par-4, and 4 strokes to complete a par-5 hole, their score could be described as "two over par" or "+2".

Even -  "Even" ("E") can be used to describe a golfer's score when it is equal to the combined par of all holes that they've completed.

A golfer would be even through three holes if they took 4 strokes to complete a par-3, 3 strokes to complete a par-4, and 5 strokes to complete a par-5 hole.

Birdie -  A " Birdie " is when a golfer scores one less stroke than par on an individual golf hole. Ex: 2 strokes on a par-3 hole.

In 2019, the PGA Tour average number of birdies per round was just 3.68 . Justin Thomas led the way, averaging 4.58 birdies per round.

For average golfers, birdies (and even pars) are far more challenging to make than pros would indicate.

MyGolfSpy and TheGrint (a Golf GPS and Golf Handicapping App) analyzed how often users of TheGrint made par, birdie or better, bogey, double bogey, and triple bogey or worse.

As you can see in the chart below, golfers with a 16-20 handicap only average 0.3 birdies or better per round. TheGrint users at the same handicap range only make 3.6 pars per round.

Birdies, Pars, Bogeys Per Handicap - Source MyGolfSpy

It's not until golfer's in that study reached a handicap in the range of 1-5 that they started averaging more than 1 birdie per round (and 9 pars per round).

Eagle -  An " Eagle " is when a golfer scores two fewer strokes than par on an individual golf hole. Ex: 3 strokes on a par-5 hole.

Eagles are most commonly achieved by reaching a par-5 green in 2 strokes, then completing the hole with one putt.

Albatross / Double Eagle -  An " Albatross " or " Double Eagle " is when a golfer scores three fewer strokes than par on an individual golf hole. Ex: 2 strokes on a par-5 hole.

An Albatross is far rarer than even a hole-in-one (ace).

Condor -  A "Condor" is when a golfer scores four strokes less than par on an individual golf hole. A hole in one on a par 5 is a condor.

Only four condors have been recorded in PGA history. Generally, the only way to accomplish a condor is to massively "cut off" a "dogleg" par-5 golf hole for a hole-in-one.

Hole-in-One / Ace -  A "Hole-in-One" or "Ace" occurs when a golfer hits their first shot into the hole (cup), completing the hole in just one stroke. 

Aces are very rare. According to American Hole 'N One, the average golfer's chances of making a hole-in-one on a par-3 hole are 12,500 to 1. The odds improve for professional golfers at 2,500 to 1.

When aces do occur, it's almost always on a par-3 hole, though hole-in-ones have been accomplished on par-4 and even par-5 holes.

Par-3 at Las Vegas Paiute Golf Resort - Source SuperSeeker

Par-3 at Las Vegas Paiute Golf Resort - Source SuperSeeker

Bogey -  A " Bogey " is when a golfer scores one stroke OVER par. Ex: 5 strokes on a par-4 hole.

While a bogey is a bad result for a low handicap or professional golfer, new and less skilled golfers are often fine with only needing one more stroke than par to complete a hole. 

If you got a bogey on every hole of a par-72 course, you'd shoot a 90. This is a major milestone for newer golfers.

Double Bogey -  A "Double Bogey" is when a golfer scores two strokes OVER par. Ex: 6 strokes on a par-4 hole.

Triple Bogey -  A "Triple Bogey" is when a golfer scores three strokes OVER par. Ex: 7 strokes on a par-4 hole.

Quadruple Bogey -  A "Quadruple Bogey" is when a golfer scores four strokes OVER par. Ex: 8 strokes on a par-4 hole.

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What is a Bogey in Golf?

What is a Bogey in Golf?

Do you ever watch golf and wonder What is a Bogey in Golf? Have you heard that phrase thrown around the course but never understood it? If so, then this post is for you! In this article, we’ll explain exactly what a bogey is in golf and how it impacts gameplay.

By the end of this post, you’ll have all your questions answered on one of golf’s most common terms. So grab your 5 iron and get ready to learn more about golf’s scoring system – let’s begin with understanding the basics of bogeys!

What is a bogey in golf scoring?

In golf scoring, the golfer is expected to take a bogey is a score that is one stroke over the par for a particular hole. Essentially, if par for a hole is 4 strokes and you complete the hole in 5 strokes, you’ve scored a bogey. Taking two came into existence in the late 19th century and holds an interesting origin story. The term hole or course ‘bogey’ is believed to have been derived from a song, “The Bogey Man,” popular in the British Isles during that period. Golfers began to use this term to describe an imaginary player, or ‘Bogey man,’ who played every hole perfectly at one stroke over par golf balls.

Averages one Bogey may not be an ideal score for professional golfers, but they are fairly common for the average player. Scoring a bogey indicates you are playing consistently, albeit slightly above the course’s difficulty level. A lower handicap golfer usually counts on scoring at least a par on most holes, and they view bogeys as setbacks. However, for a higher handicap golfer, bogeys can be a sign of progress and an indication of improving skills.

Understanding the amount of shots bogeys is crucial to mastering the scoring system in golf. The style of golf adds an extra layer of strategy to the game, making golfers consider each shot’s implications carefully. Now that you understand what a bogey is, you can use this knowledge to enhance your gameplay and strategy.

Historical Meaning of Bogey

As we delve deeper into golf, it’s interesting to note the historical context of the term’ bogey.’ As mentioned earlier, the term has its roots in the late 19th-century British Isles, from a popular song to the golf course.

The song “The Bogey Man” depicted a mystical character known to cause trouble and unease. This character, the Bogeyman, was invoked by golfers to personify an opponent they strove to defeat. The Bogey man became a standard competitor, playing each hole perfectly with one stroke over par.

For a golfer to beat the ‘Bogey man,’ they’d have to complete the hole in par or better. This playful competition added another layer of intrigue to the game and gave birth to the scoring term we now know as ‘bogey.’

Over time, the term ‘bogey’ crossed the Atlantic and began to be used widely in American golf around the turn of the 20th century. Its use and acceptance have been so widespread that it’s now a universally recognized term in golf.

Understanding the historical significance of a bogey not only offers a fascinating insight into the game’s history but also adds depth to a golfer’s appreciation of the sport. Whether you’re an avid golfer or a casual fan, knowing about bogeys and one stroke under par can enhance your understanding and enjoyment of the game.

What is a bogey competition in golf?

A bogey competition in golf is a scoring format where players aim to do better than the ‘bogey’ score set for each hole. The bogey score is typically set at one stroke over par. In a bogey competition, golfers compete against the ‘Bogey man’ or the ‘Course,’ aiming to score as much under or at the bogey score as possible.

For each hole, a good golfer receives points based on how they compare to the bogey score. If a player completes a hole in fewer strokes than the bogey score, they win that hole. The hole is halved if they complete it in the same number of strokes as the bogey score. If it takes more strokes to complete the hole than the bogey score, the ‘Bogey man’ or ‘Course’ wins the hole.

18-hole Bogey competitions are a great way to add excitement and challenge to the game. It encourages golfers to remain mindful of their scores and strive for better results each hole. Ultimately, this format allows players to test their skills and compete against an imaginary opponent – all while having fun!

Bogey golf format

What is a bogey in golf?

The bogey golf format is essentially an extension of the bogey competition. This means that in addition to the hole-by-hole competition against the ‘Bogey man’ or ‘Course,’ the golfer’s total score is also compared to the cumulative bogey score for the entire course. The objective in this format is to finish with a score as low as possible compared to the total bogey score.

In the bogey format, as with the bogey competition, the “bogey golfer” receives points for each hole based on their score relative to the bogey score. A hole is won if the golfer completes it in fewer strokes than the bogey score, halved if it takes the same number of strokes, and lost if it takes more. The total points from all the holes are then summed to calculate the golfer’s final score.

The bogey golf format offers a unique and challenging approach to golf scoring. Not only -one shot add a layer of strategy to each hole, but it also encourages golfers to stay consistent throughout the entire course. By competing against a standard ‘Bogey man,’ golfers have a constant target to aim for, adding a hint of friendly competition to each round. Taking one format can improve their overall game by pushing golfers to constantly aim for better scores. Whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned player, the bogey golf format can offer a fresh and exciting way to experience the game of golf.

Scoring a Bogey is Bad or good?

Whether scoring a bogey is good or bad is subjective and depends largely on the skill level and expectations of the golfer. A bogey represents a shortfall for seasoned players and professionals who aim for par or better on each hole. It signifies a deviation from their expected performance level, and too many bogeys can negatively impact their scorecard.

On the other hand, for novice golfers or those with a higher handicap, scoring a bogey can be seen as an achievement. Given that par is a standard set based on the expected performance of a professional golfer, beginners and amateur players often find it challenging to meet this standard. Thus, for them, scoring a bogey, which is one stroke over par, is quite a realistic and reasonable target. Consistently achieving bogeys can indicate improvement and consistency in their game.

However, it’s important to remember that golf is as much a game of self-improvement as it is of competition. Thus, irrespective of your skill level, the focus should always be on improving your personal best. Whether a bogey is good or bad for you specifically depends on your current skill level and personal goals in the game. Hence, it’s essential to set realistic expectations and strive for continuous improvement instead of getting discouraged by the occasional bogey.

Types of Bogey

Double bogey.

A double bogey term in golf denotes a player’s score on an individual hole two strokes over par. While professional golfers strive to avoid such scores, double bogeys can occasionally surface even in high-level play due to the unpredictable nature of the game. For beginners and high-handicap golfers, double bogeys are more common. Regardless of skill level, a player scoring a double bogey signals an opportunity for improvement and strategy refinements in their game.

Triple Bogey

A triple bogey indicates a score of three strokes over par on a hole. Such a score is generally considered substantial in golf and often results from significant challenges, such as landing in water hazards or out-of-bounds areas. However, rather than signaling defeat, a triple bogey can serve as a valuable learning experience, highlighting areas of the game that require more practice and attention.

Quadruple Bogey

Lastly, a quadruple bogey, which is four strokes over par on a single hole, is a score that most golfers aim to avoid. It typically represents a particularly challenging or problematic hole for the golfer. While it’s a score not typically seen in professional play, it does occur, especially on difficult courses or under adverse conditions. Like other high-over-par scores, a quadruple bogey can catalyze reassessment and practice, prompting golfers to hone their skills, address weaknesses, and continue improving their games.

Bogeys For The Average Golfer

An expert golfer is expected. A bogey is simply one stroke over par on an individual hole for the average golfer. As such, it’s important to note that bogeys are not always bad – they can be excellent learning experiences and opportunities for improvement. Consistently achieving bogey scores or better is an admirable and achievable goal many golfers enjoy working towards.

For novice golfers, the bogey is a great place to start. It’s realistic and achievable, especially with consistent practice and persistent effort. With time, these players may find they can consistently achieve scores lower than the bogey score on each hole.

Bogeys and the Handicap System

The concept of bogeys, one of the most coveted, plays a fundamental role in the handicap system of golf, designed to level the playing field between golfers of varying abilities. A golfer’s handicap measures their potential ability and is calculated based on their best scores. The higher the handicap, the more strokes over par a golfer is expected to score on average. Therefore, for golfers with a high handicap, scoring a bogey or even a double bogey can be seen as a success, not a failure.

In this sense, the handicap system and the concept of bogeys work together to make golf an inclusive and approachable sport for all skill levels. Providing a tangible and achievable target allows less experienced players to compete effectively with more skilled opponents, fostering a sense of accomplishment and motivation to improve.

Bogeys: The Road to Improvement

Bogeys can also serve as milestones on a golfer’s journey to improving their skills. A beginner may start by scoring triple or quadruple bogeys but can use these experiences as learning opportunities. They can adjust their technique or strategy by analyzing their strokes and identifying where things went awry. Over time, they may progress to double bogeys, then to single bogeys, eventually reaching par, each step signifying an improvement.

Every Golfer Makes Bogeys and Worse, Even the Pros

How to minimize bogeys in your game.

For many golfers, the ultimate goal is to minimize the number of bogeys made during a round. Achieving this requires strategy, skill refinement, mental toughness, and practice. Here are some tips to help you reduce the occurrence of bogeys in your games:

Practice Makes Perfect

Consistent and well-targeted practice is the first step to minimizing bogeys. Focus not only on your long game but also on your short game, as many golfers lose strokes around the green. Practice your putting and chipping regularly to gain confidence and accuracy.

Understand Your Game

Understanding your strengths and weaknesses is crucial to developing a game strategy that minimizes bogeys. If your long game is strong, but your short game is weak, you might concentrate on hitting the ball closer to the green to reduce the need for chipping and putting. Conversely, if your short game is your strength, you might play more conservatively off the tee to keep the ball in play.

Mental Strength

Mental strength and concentration play a significant role in golfing performance. Staying focused and calm, especially after a poor shot, can help you avoid successive mistakes that lead to bogeys. Techniques such as visualization and breathing exercises can help enhance your mental game.

Course Management

Understanding and strategizing for the golf course and ball you’re playing on can go a long way in reducing bogeys. Learning about the layout, hazards, and wind direction can help you make informed decisions that keep the ball in play more often.

Understanding the Concept of a Bogey Golfer

A golf term often thrown around is par and “bogey golfer.” Simply put, a bogey golfer refers to a player who averages about one bogey per hole. A bogey is a golf score of 1 over par on a single hole for those unfamiliar. This means that if the hole’s par rating is 4 and a golfer scores 5 on that hole, the golfer has made a bogey.

Throughout par 72, a bogey golfer’s average score rounds up to about 90. While many strive to improve their scores, it’s essential to note that being a bogey golfer is already an achievement, as it signifies a player performing better than most recreational golfers.

Course and Slope Rating in Golf

Learning about course ace and slope ratings is important to understand your game better. These factors are calculated by a rating team that spends time on the course, taking measurements, considering obstacles, short par, and consulting with the facility’s staff.

Handicap of 15 The ratings, reflecting the course’s difficulty and length, are certified by golf associations and posted on the club’s scorecard. Modern course rating considers length and obstacles like bunkers and water, offering a more comprehensive reflection of a course’s difficulty.

The Sevaluatesch and Bogey Golfer Distinction

It’s key to note the score of one stroke and the distinction between a scratch golfer, a bogey golfer, and a golf style. A scratch golfer, by definition, is a golfer who can reach a 470-yard hole-in-two for males (driving 250 yards) or a 400-yard hole-in-two for females (driving 210 yards).

Nine holes Meanwhile, a bogey golfer is a male golfer with a handicap index of 17.5 to 22.4 who can reach a 370-yard hole in two or a female golfer with a handicap index of 21.5 to 26.4 who can reach a 280-yard hole in two. The rating team and match play evaluate a course’s difficulty considering both types of golfers.

What is the Bogey Rating in Golf?

Another term albatross that golfers should familiarize themselves with is bogey rating. Many golfers are unaware that each golf course has a bogey rating, which evaluates how many strokes a bogey golfer will need to play the course. Fairway This rating is used to calculate the slope rating, mulligan denoting the relative difficulty of a course for bogey golfers compared to scratch golfers. For example, a course with a bogey rating of 73.6 is considered as easy for bogey golfers as a par-72 course is for scratch golfers.

Learning about (2021) the concept of reaching the green golfer would be a bogey and its second shot-related terms can help you understand your game better and work on minimizing bogeys in your game. Focusing on practice, understanding your strengths and weaknesses, mental toughness, and course management can help you improve your links golf courses. With the dedication of using one and hard work, we’re sure you can reach your golf goal of reducing mistakes and bogeys!

A bogey in golf experts refers to a tee shot to a score of one over par on a single hole. For instance, if an 18 hole is rated par 4, and you score 5, that’s considered a bogey. It’s an essential term in golf scoring that most golfers strive to avoid or reduce PGA tours.

A scratch mean in golf matchplay is a player who can play to the course’s par rating, whereas a bogey golfer averages about one bogey per hole. Thus, with the number of shots, two under par, a bogey golfer typically scores one stroke higher than the par score for each hole, leading to an average total score of around 90 for a par 72-course par 3 and 5.

A bogey rating in golf assesses the number of strokes three under par a bogey golfer (one who averages a bogey per hole) would take to play a specific course. This rating calculates the slope rating, which indicates the relative difficulty of bogey and course for bogey golfers compared to scratch golfers full 18.

Minimizing golf hole bogeys in your golf game requires hole-in-one regular and focused practice, understanding your strengths and weaknesses, par 5 maintaining mental strength in tournaments, and effective course management. Golf club involves developing short and long games and making strategic decisions based on your abilities and the course layout.

Being a one-shot expert golfer bogey means that you average about one bogey per hole. Although birdie golfers aim to reduce their bogeys, being a bogey golfer is an achievement as it means performing better than most recreational golfers on par-4 USGA.

I hope this article has helped you better understand the concept of a bogey in golf and its associated terms. Being aware of these concepts can prove to be very helpful in improving your golfing performance. With regular practice, strategic decision-making, and course management, you should be able to reduce the number of bogeys in your game. 

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  • Championships

Before the Competition

5 before the competition, setting the terms of the competition.

  • Set clear and concise terms for each competition.
  • Make these terms available to players in advance of the competition.
  • Interpret the terms should any questions arise.
  • For a junior competition where players must not be older than 18, the Terms of the Competition might state that a player must be 18 or younger on the first day of the year or another date such as the final scheduled day of the competition. For a senior competition where players must be 55 or older, the Terms of the Competition might state that a player must have reached their 55th birthday on or before the first day of the competition.
  • Setting upper or lower limits on handicaps.
  • Limiting the maximum difference between partners’ handicaps. The Committee may also choose to reduce the handicap for the player with the higher handicap to meet the requirement, or
  • Limiting the maximum total handicaps of partners. The Committee may also choose to reduce the handicap for one or both players to meet the requirement.
  • For a multi-round competition played over one day or consecutive days, specifying whether each player will play the entire competition with the handicap as of the first round, or if the player will use their revised handicap for each round. It is recommended that the player’s handicaps remain unchanged between such rounds.
  • Method of entry, such as completing an online entry form, returning an entry form by mail or entering names on a sheet any time before the player’s start time.
  • How and when any entry fee is to be paid.
  • When entries must be received. The Committee can stop accepting entries on a specific date or allow players to enter up to the day of the competition.
  • The procedure to be used in determining the field when the competition is oversubscribed, such as accepting entries in the order received, through a qualifier or based on lowest handicaps.
  • Dates of play or, if it is a match play event over a long period of time, the final date by which each match must be completed.
  • Form of play (for example, match play, stroke play or stroke play qualifying for match play).
  • Number and order of holes in a round.
  • Number of rounds, including whether there will be a cut.
  • If there is to be a cut, when it will be made, if ties for the final position will be broken and how many players will continue play in later rounds.
  • Which teeing areas are to be used. For handicap competitions, the Committee may specify which tees all players must use or that the tees to be used are dependent on the player’s handicap, gender and /or age. Alternatively, the Committee may allow each player to choose which tees they wish to play from.
  • Stroke index allocation, such as the order of holes at which handicap strokes are to be given or received.
  • If there will be multiple flights or draws and how they will be organized, see Section 5G(1) .
  • What prizes will be awarded (including who is eligible to win those prizes). For competitions involving amateur golfers, the Committee should ensure that prizes for amateurs are allowed under the Rules of Amateur Status.
  • Relative to par, such as two times par,
  • A fixed number, such as 8, 9 or 10, or
  • With reference to the player’s handicap, for example net double bogey.
  • The maximum par for the holes being played . For example, for a par 3 course it may be appropriate to set the maximum score per hole to be a fixed score of 6; however if there are par 5’s on a course then it would not be appropriate to have a fixed score as low as 6.
  • The standard of the golfers taking part . For example, for a beginners’ competition the maximum score should give the players a reasonable opportunity to complete the holes but be at a level to encourage players to pick up when they have had real difficulty on the hole.
  • Whether scores are to be submitted for handicap purposes . Where the Committee wants a competition to count for handicap purposes, the maximum hole score should not be set lower than net double bogey.
  • Any restrictions on coaches or advice givers (see Model Local Rule Section 8H ).
  • The order in which the team members will play, for example, if it must be in handicap order, or if it will be decided by the team captain.
  • If tied matches will be acceptable or if they must be played until a winner is determined.
  • The number of points awarded for winning or tying a match.
  • In competitions with multiple teams, how the winner would be determined if two or more teams are tied at the end of the competition.
  • If some matches are completed while others cannot be completed on the arranged day due to poor light or weather, the Terms of the Competition should clarify how the completed and incomplete matches will be treated. For example, the Committee could count completed matches to stand as played and incomplete matches to be treated as a tie or replayed on a later date. Or, that all matches are to be replayed, and each team is free to alter its original team.
  • If any remaining matches will be played to a conclusion once a team has won the match or competition.
  • Specify what the result of an individual match will be if one or more players are unable to start or finish a match for any reason (such as illness). For example, the Committee could state that the result of such a match will be a tied match, or a win for the opponent. If holes up and down are taken into consideration for countback purposes, the Committee may also decide to specify a score for the match, for example 6&5.
  • The number of scores to count in each team’s total score.
  • If the scores to be counted will be based on 18 holes or on a hole-by-hole basis.
  • How a tie in the overall competition will be decided, for example by a play-off, a method of matching scores (see Section 5A(6) ) or considering discarded scores.
  • Defining the scoring area and allowing a player to make alterations on their scorecard up until they have left that scoring area. This would mean that, even if the player has handed the scorecard to a referee or recorder, changes could still be made while the player is in the area.
  • Providing a box for the player to deposit the scorecard, in which case it is considered returned as soon as the player places it in the box. This approach might not give a player as much protection from returning an incorrect scorecard, but it may be the best method when limited resources are available or many players are finishing at the same time (for example, when there is a shotgun start).
  • Total the scores or, in a Four-Ball competition, determine the score that counts for the side.
  • Enter the points scored for each hole on the scorecard in Stableford.
  • Enter whether the hole was won, lost or tied in Par/Bogey.
  • Enter specific details on the scorecard such as name, date and name of the competition.
  • The match ends in a tie,
  • The match will be extended starting at a specific hole other than the first hole, or
  • There will be a play-off over a fixed number of holes (for example, 9 or 18 holes).
  • When the play-off will be held, for example if it will start at a specific time, as soon as possible after the last group finishes or on a later date.
  • Which holes will be used for the play-off and the order in which they will be played.
  • The number of holes over which the play-off will be played, for example, if it will be a hole-by-hole play-off or over a longer period such as 2, 4 or 18 holes, and what to do if it there is still a tie.
  • In the regular form of stroke play, if a play-off for a handicap competition is over fewer than 18 holes, the number of holes played should be used to determine the number of strokes to be deducted. For example, if a play-off is over one hole, one-eighteenth of the handicaps should be deducted from the scores for the play-off hole. Handicap stroke fractions should be applied in accordance with the rules or recommendations contained within the World Handicap System TM publications or other guidance as provided by the handicapping body in the local jurisdiction.
  • For play-offs for net competitions where the stroke index allocation is used, such as Four-Ball, Par/Bogey or Stableford competitions, handicap strokes should be applied during the play-off holes as they were assigned for the competition, using the stroke index allocation.
  • Players are only required to return a scorecard for the play-off if the Committee issues them to the players.
  • If this method is used in a competition with a multiple tee start, it is recommended that the "last nine holes, last six holes, etc." are holes 10-18, 13-18, etc.
  • For net competitions where the stroke index allocation as set by the Committee is not used, such as individual stroke play, if the last nine, last six, last three holes scenario is used, one-half, one-third, one-sixth, etc. of the handicaps should be deducted from the score for those holes. Handicap stroke fractions should be applied in accordance with the rules or recommendations contained within the World Handicap System TM publications or other guidance as provided by the handicapping body operating in the local jurisdiction.
  • In net competitions where the stroke index allocation as set by the Committee is used, such as Four-Ball stroke play, Par/Bogey or Stableford competitions, handicap strokes should be applied consistently with how they were applied for the competition.
  • When the result is recorded on an official scoreboard or other identified place, or
  • When the result is reported to a person identified by the Committee.
  • All results have been posted on the scoreboard or notice board,
  • The winners have been announced at a prize giving, or
  • The trophy has been awarded.
  • Since players begin a round with the expectation that a certain number of holes will be played and may base their play on that, the number of holes to be played in a round should not be changed once that round has started. For example, if bad weather results in play being suspended after all the players have completed 9 holes of an 18-hole round, the Committee should not announce the results based on only 9 holes.
  • If circumstances such as bad weather affect the number of rounds that can be played in the time available, the number of rounds to be played, or number of holes in any rounds not yet started, may be altered to accommodate the circumstances. Similarly, if those circumstances mean the planned format cannot be accommodated in the time available, the format of the competition may be changed.
  • The method for deciding ties should not be altered unless there are exceptional circumstances. For example, if the method of deciding a tie for a stroke-play competition was stated to be a hole-by-hole play-off, but bad weather meant such a play-off was not possible, the Committee can change the method of deciding the tie to a scorecard count-back.

Marking the Course

  • Penalty areas that contain bodies of water should not be made a part of the general area, but their edges may be adjusted.
  • Other penalty areas may be removed or added, or their edges altered to change the difficulty of a hole, such as where it is considered appropriate to provide a more severe penalty for an errant shot. For example, the Committee may decide to mark areas of dense trees and bushes as penalty areas for general play, but not for competitions. Care should be taken in doing this so that it is clearly communicated to any players who regularly play the course.
  • When penalty areas are added or removed, the Committee should consult the rules or recommendations contained within the World Handicap System™ publications or other guidance as provided by the handicapping body in the local jurisdiction to determine if the change will have an impact on the issued Course Rating™.
  • The colour of some penalty areas may be changed from red to yellow or the reverse. For example, for certain competitions it may be desirable for a penalty area close to a putting green to be marked yellow where the Committee does not want to allow the option of dropping on the putting green side of the penalty area when the ball has rolled back into it. In some cases, it may also make sense to provide a dropping zone as an additional option, for example, for an island green where players have a long carry over water.
  • For general play, the Committee may have used a minimal number of stakes to mark penalty areas or they may have been removed, resulting in portions of some penalty areas being outside the marked area. For competitions, all stakes should be inspected and supplemented if necessary to ensure that the penalty areas are properly marked for the competition.
  • When possible, it is good practice to paint red or yellow lines around penalty areas rather than just relying on stakes. A line will ensure the proper areas are included or excluded, the edge will not be altered by the removal of a stake and a player will easily be able to determine where to take relief. Typically, when a line has been painted, fewer stakes are required.

Local Rules

  • Local Rules have the same status as a Rule of Golf for that competition or course, and
  • The use of Local Rules should be limited as much as possible and be used only to deal with the types of situations and policies covered in Section 8 .
  • It is not recommended to change any Local Rules for a competition once play has begun for a stroke-play round, unless the change is made before any players in the competition could have been affected by the change.
  • Defining Course Boundaries and other Areas of the Course ( Sections 8A-8D ),
  • Defining Special Relief Procedures ( Section 8E ),
  • Defining Abnormal Course Conditions and Integral Objects ( Section 8F ),
  • Use of Specific Equipment ( Section 8G ),
  • Who May Give Advice to Players ( Section 8H ),
  • When and Where Players May Practise ( Section 8I ),
  • Procedures for Suspension of Play ( Section 8J ), and
  • Pace of Play Policies ( Section 8K ).
  • Scorecard Responsibilities ( Section 8L ), and
  • Model Local Rules for Players With Disabilities ( Section 8M ).

Eligibility Requirements for Players with Disabilities to use Rule 25

Defining practice areas.

  • A Local Rule may allow practice on limited and defined parts of the course, for example where there is no permanent practice ground. But, where this applies, it is recommended that players not be allowed to practise on any putting greens or from any bunkers on the course.
  • If the competition starts late in the day and the Committee does not want to restrict players from playing the course earlier in the day, or
  • If there has been a suspension of play and it would be more efficient to allow players to hit a few shots from somewhere on the course as opposed to bringing them back to the practice range.
  • Rule 5.2 covers when practice is allowed or prohibited before or between rounds in a competition, but the Committee may adopt a Local Rule to modify those provisions (see Model Local Rule I-1 ).
  • Rule 5.5 gives the Committee the option to adopt a Local Rule to prohibit practice on or around the putting green of the hole just completed (see  Model Local Rule I-2 ).

Teeing Areas and Hole Locations

  • In selecting the locations, the ability of the players should be considered so that the locations selected are not so difficult as to slow down play significantly or so easy as not to challenge better players.
  • The speed of the greens is a significant factor in choosing the location of the hole. While a hole location may work well for a slower green, it may prove to be too severe when the speed of the greens is increased.
  • The Committee should avoid placing a hole on a slope where the ball will not come to rest. When the contours of the green allow, holes should be placed where there is an area of two to three feet around the hole that is relatively level so that putts struck at the proper speed will stop around the hole.
  • Setting holes where there is enough putting green surface between the hole and the front and sides of the putting green to accommodate the approach on that particular hole. For example, placing the hole immediately behind a bunker when a long approach is required by the majority of the field is usually not recommended.
  • Balancing hole locations for the entire course with respect to left, right, centre, front and back locations.

Draw, Groups and Starting Times

  • Randomly - Players are picked at random and placed in the draw as chosen.
  • Qualifying Scores - Players could play one or more qualifying rounds. The players are then placed into the draw based on their scores.
  • Handicap - Players could be placed in the draw by handicap so that the player with the lowest handicap plays the one with the highest in the first round, the second lowest against the second highest, and so on.
  • Seeding - Certain players, such as a defending champion, could be seeded into the draw in specific locations, while other players are placed either randomly or through qualifying scores.
  • The order in which scores are returned, with the first score to be returned receiving the lowest available number and so forth,
  • A scorecard play-off, or
  • A random draw among the players who are tied at a specific score.

Match Play Draw

  • The Committee should set a date and time by which each match must be completed.
  • The Committee should specify how the result of the match will be decided should the players fail to complete the match by the specified date, such as disqualifying both players or putting the player named first or second in the draw into the next round.
  • The Committee may also decide to allow the completion date of a tie to be extended if there are good reasons for doing so. If they decide to do so, it is a matter for the Committee to determine the permissions around such an extension and interpret those permissions.

Pace of Play Policy

  • A maximum time to complete a round, a hole, a series of holes and / or a stroke.
  • A definition of when the first group is out of position and when each other group is out of position in relation to the group playing ahead of it.
  • When and how a group or individual players may be timed.
  • If and when players may be warned that they are being timed or have had a bad time.
  • The penalty structure for breaches of the Policy.
  • The Committee should adopt a Local Rule setting a Pace of Play Policy (see Rule 5.6b ).
  • Such a Policy should at least set a maximum time for completing the round or parts of the round.
  • The Policy should stipulate any penalties for a player’s failure to comply with the Policy.
  • Management practices such as reducing group sizes, increasing starting intervals, introducing starter’s gaps and using a call-up procedure should there be delays on long par 3’s, driveable par 4’s or reachable par 5’s.
  • Considering fundamental changes to course set up such as widening fairways, reducing the thickness or length of rough, or reducing the speed of greens. When changes such as these are made to the course, the Committee should consult the rules or recommendations contained within the World Handicap System TM publications or other guidance as provided by the handicapping body operating in the local jurisdiction to assess the impact on the issued Course Rating TM and follow the procedures to make any necessary adjustments.

Code of Conduct Policy

  • When setting limits or prohibiting a player’s actions, the Committee should consider the different cultures of the players. For example, something that may be considered inappropriate behaviour in one culture may be acceptable under another.
  • The penalty structure that will apply for a breach of the Code (see Section 5I(4) for an example).
  • Who will have the authority to decide penalties and sanctions. For example, it could be the case that only certain Committee members have the authority to apply such penalties, a minimum number of Committee members need to be involved in making such a decision or any member of the Committee has authority to make such a decision.
  • Whether there will be an appeals process.
  • Failure to care for the course, such as not raking bunkers or not replacing or filling divots.
  • Unacceptable language.
  • Abuse of clubs or the course.
  • Failing to show proper consideration for other players, referees or spectators.
  • A prohibition on players entering all or specified no play zones.
  • Limitations on the use of social media.
  • Details on acceptable clothing.
  • Change existing penalties in the Rules of Golf, such as by increasing the penalty for a player who fails to mark their ball before lifting it on the putting green, from one stroke to two strokes.
  • Introduce new penalties for actions unrelated to player behaviour, for example a Committee may not use a Code of Conduct to introduce an unauthorized Local Rule, such as penalizing a player for hitting a ball over properties located out of bounds, or introducing a penalty for a player who fails to announce to another player that they are going to lift a ball to identify it.
  • Apply stroke penalties for inappropriate player behaviour before or between rounds. But the Committee may apply other sanctions, such as withdrawing the player from the competition or refusing to allow the player to enter future competitions.
  • Penalize a player under a Code of Conduct for a breach of a spectator code by the player’s family or supporters, such as by penalizing a player when a family member walks on the fairway in a junior competition when they are not allowed to do so.
  • If there will be a warning system before any penalty or other sanction is imposed.
  • If the sanctions will be of a disciplinary nature or involve stroke penalties or other penalties under the Rules.  Disciplinary sanctions that a Committee may impose include refusing to allow the player to enter one or more future competitions run by the Committee or requiring the player to play at a particular time of day. Such sanctions are separate from the Rules of Golf and it is a matter for the Committee to write and interpret any such sanctions.
  • If the penalty for each breach will be set as one penalty stroke or the general penalty and if penalties will escalate, such as one penalty stroke for the first breach and the general penalty for the second breach. The Committee should not use any other types of penalties that would apply to a player’s score.
  • If a penalty will automatically apply whenever a player breaches one of its standards or if such a penalty will be left to the Committee’s discretion.
  • If breaches of a Code of Conduct will be carried forward to later rounds in multiple round events where there are escalating penalties for multiple breaches. For example, in a 36-hole competition, where a first breach results in a warning and a second breach results in one penalty stroke, the Committee may provide that any breaches from round 1 carry forward to round 2.
  • If different penalties will apply for breaching different aspects of the Code.
  • If the Code of Conduct is to be applied to a player’s caddie. A Code of Conduct automatically applies to a player’s caddie through Rule 10.3c , therefore, if the Committee does not want any aspects of a Code of Conduct to apply to a player’s caddie, this aspect needs to be stated in the Code of Conduct.
  • First breach of the Code of Conduct – warning or Committee sanction.
  • Second breach – one penalty stroke.
  • Third breach – general penalty.
  • Fourth breach or any serious misconduct – disqualification.
  • First breach of the Code of Conduct – one penalty stroke.
  • Second breach – general penalty.
  • Third breach or any serious misconduct – disqualification.

Information for Players and Referees

  • If a handicap allowance will apply and what the handicap allowance will be.
  • The stroke index allocation to be used to identify the order of holes where players will give or receive handicap strokes.
  • In stroke play, the competition involves all players and, because each player in the competition cannot be present to protect their own interests, protecting the field is an important responsibility that all players in the competition share.
  • Therefore, in stroke play, if there is a reasonable possibility that a player’s ball close to the hole could help another player who is about to play from off the green, both players should ensure that the player whose ball is close to the hole marks and lifts that ball before the other player plays.
  • If all players follow this best practice, it ensures the protection of the interests of everyone in the competition.
  • Defining Special Relief Procedures ( Section 8E ), and
  • Defining Abnormal Course Conditions and Integral Objects ( Section 8F ).
  • Extending the use of Model Local Rule E-4 (Relief from Aeration Holes) to be used for vertical cuts.
  • Extending the use of Model Local Rule F-10 (Damage by Animals) to bunkers.
  • Allowing the use of non-conforming clubs.
  • Extending the search time from three minutes to five minutes.
  • Allowing a player to have more than one caddie.
  • Waiving the penalty for playing from the wrong teeing area if the player corrects the error within one minute of making the stroke.
  • Reducing the penalty for making a stroke with a non-conforming club from disqualification to the general penalty.
  • Applying a penalty of one stroke for a player failing to notify another player that they are going to lift a ball to identify it.
  • Considering all the circumstances, and
  • Treating the situation in a way that is reasonable, fair and consistent with how similar situations are treated under the Rules and modified Rules for the format.

Golf Monthly

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How to mark card in bogey competition for handicap

  • Thread starter wookie
  • Start date May 6, 2013
  • May 6, 2013

Q-School Graduate

I understand the scoring itself for a bogey comp ( ie net par is a + net bogey a -) but should you hole out each time anyway for handicap purposes or does a loss just count as a net bogey as worse case rather then a nett double bogey as worse case in stableford? Handicap wise today I have two two shot holes (hopefully not for much longer) but there is an upper limit of 18 as its a board comp so what should happen here?  

Foxholer

Blackballed

You should hole out in the same way you would for a Stableford comp. And register the score with Gross Score in 1 column with win/loss/half in another column. Qualifying Bogey comps have 1 stupid (imo) trait. You don't get credit, for handicap, for a birdie on a shot hole!  

pbrown7582

Money List Winner

Just one point here a nett par is a "0" not a + a nett birdie is + and nett bogey -.  

chrisd

Major Champion

You absolutely don't have to hole out. You are playing Matchplay against the course and that is how you score it, lose the hole and that's it, no matter by how many shots you may have taken and the same in winning a hole -an albatross is of no value in this format score wise. We had our pro tell everyone last year to hole out for the card, I told him that was wrong but he insisted, until he read the rules later and the comp was declared non qualifying as there were complaints about the instruction and the effect it had on how people played as there is a different mentality to Matchplay from strokeplay  

chrisd said: You absolutely don't have to hole out. You are playing Matchplay against the course and that is how you score it, lose the hole and that's it, no matter by how many shots you may have taken and the same in winning a hole -an albatross is of no value in this format score wise. We had our pro tell everyone last year to hole out for the card, I told him that was wrong but he insisted, until he read the rules later and the comp was declared non qualifying as there were complaints about the instruction and the effect it had on how people played as there is a different mentality to Matchplay from strokeplay Click to expand...

fundy

Ryder Cup Winner

Foxholer said: Indeed, you can play it that way, but the OP stated 'for handicap purpose' which requires holing out. Bogey comp is (somewhat bizarrely imo) actually defined as a Strokeplay competition - in Rules of Golf. Provided all other conditions apply, Congu encourage/require Bogey (and the rarer Par) comps to be qualifiers. The change in attitude is interesting but not one I like - though maybe should try more. I'm much happier taking the 1 point rather than being aggressive to halve and possibly score zero points. From memory, 2008 (or maybe 2004) was something of an epiphany for Congu's approach to Bogey/Par events. A previous club used to play Bogey as 3/4 h'cap making it a non-qualifier. Your Competition Rules may have been based on the earlier notion that they'd be NQ-ers. Picking up before holing out would automatically blob the hole for handicap. So I believe your Pro was correct about holing out - for handicap! What 'Rules' were you referring to? If they were Terms of Comp, then the club should adjust them as per Congu's recommendation. Click to expand...
fundy said: Why on earth would you put how many stableford points you hypothetically would get if playing a stableford above trying to improve how you do in the bogey competition which is actually what you are playing? If playing 4bbb do you lag putts when putting for a half so as not to lose a stableford point? Click to expand...

The rules of golf state for playing Bogie Comps "The marker is responsible for marking only the gross number of strokes for each hole where the competitor makes a net score equal to or less than the fixed score." So if you score worse than par nett then you don't have to record a score! If you are scoring for handicap purpose then you wouldn't be playing what, in effect, is a Matchplay against the course. You absolutely don't record any Stableford points. No pro can tell you to ignore the rules of golf  

chrisd said: The rules of golf state for playing Bogie Comps "The marker is responsible for marking only the gross number of strokes for each hole where the competitor makes a net score equal to or less than the fixed score." So if you score worse than par nett then you don't have to record a score! If you are scoring for handicap purpose then you wouldn't be playing what, in effect, is a Matchplay against the course. You absolutely don't record any Stableford points. No pro can tell you to ignore the rules of golf Click to expand...
Foxholer said: Here's the Rule re Bogey/Par and Stablefors http://www.randa.org/en/Rules-and-A...cisionId=BF8FFD19-94AE-4E7D-B6FA-670B2B072C23 Note the only reference in the rule to matchplay... 'The scoring for bogey and par competitions is made as in match play. ' The same rule also specifies that in Stableford comps (Handicap is a 'Stablefors metric, and qualifying comps can/should be considered these) ... 'The marker is responsible for marking only the gross number of strokes at each hole where the competitor’s net score earns one or more points.' These scores have to be complimentary if the player is to gain any value from the '1-pointers' or nett-bogey in the handicap portion of the round. Bogey/Par comps are certainly deemed eligible to be qualifying - just do a search for 'bogey/par' in the UHS manual. Your Pro has certainly done nothing that BREAKS the Roles of Golf - merely ADDED the requirement for Congu handicaps. Unless the net-bogey/1-pointer scores are entered, please demonstrate how the proper values for such qualifying. And you seemed to agree re qualifying on this thread... http://forums.golf-monthly.co.uk/archive/index.php/t-38886.html Note... I certainly never (intended to) imply that the Stableford score be entered. My original post stated 'as per Stableford' which is not the same as 'as Stableford'. Again subtle but important - same as Bogey/Par is subtlely but importantly different from Matchplay against the course. Click to expand...
chrisd said: I quoted rule 32 - 1a and the requirement is to record only scores which, in effect, count. To tell everyone to hole out and record a score is contrary IMO to the rules of golf and, in essence, change the nature of the game and rules. The reason to call it as rules of stroke play is to stop players agreeing to ignore transgressions of the rules as they are entitled to do in Matchplay because the end result affects the entire field and not just the players you are out with. The pro is not entitled to add to golf rules for CONGU handicap purposes! Click to expand...

I would prefer this to be questioned in the Rules section of the forum. Our club when the instruction was given by the pro to hole out and record scores were advised to treat it as a non qualifier as that instruction was considered as being against the rules of golf. If some competitors decide not to hole out, as per the Rules, then they can't be penalised for their actions. In essence Stableford and bogie comps are scored exactly the same except that a one pointer in Stableford is of no use in bogie comps and therefore no score need to be recorded and no one can be penalised for their failure to write a score on their card. I guess that in "Stableford adjustment" a no score is adjusted to a nett double bogie for handicapping but if the Rules of Golf state that you only have to record the score if it betters or equals the fixed score, and the fixed score is par on the hole, then as the rules are paramount you DO NOT have to write a score if it doesn't equal or better nett par!  

HomerJSimpson

HomerJSimpson

Hall of famer.

We have one bogey comp and it is played as a qualifier and we are told to hole out. It has been the subject of much debate as I along with many others think we played this as a non-qualifier until about 5 years ago and there wasn't the need to play the hole out. Its been decided that the current method stands and so its treated much the same as a medal  

If that was the case for our bogey comp Id either not bother playing or would almost undoubtedly NR for handicap purposes, either its a bogey comp or a medal - not both  

chrisd said: I would prefer this to be questioned in the Rules section of the forum. Our club when the instruction was given by the pro to hole out and record scores were advised to treat it as a non qualifier as that instruction was considered as being against the rules of golf. If some competitors decide not to hole out, as per the Rules, then they can't be penalised for their actions. In essence Stableford and bogie comps are scored exactly the same except that a one pointer in Stableford is of no use in bogie comps and therefore no score need to be recorded and no one can be penalised for their failure to write a score on their card. I guess that in "Stableford adjustment" a no score is adjusted to a nett double bogie for handicapping but if the Rules of Golf state that you only have to record the score if it betters or equals the fixed score, and the fixed score is par on the hole, then as the rules are paramount you DO NOT have to write a score if it doesn't equal or better nett par! Click to expand...
fundy said: If that was the case for our bogey comp Id either not bother playing or would almost undoubtedly NR for handicap purposes, either its a bogey comp or a medal - not both Click to expand...
Foxholer said: Where the thread resides is beside the point. Neither forum is absolutely appropriate. You are also mis-interpreting the 'Stableford Adjustment' term and what I was asking. SA reduces scores over net DOUBLE-bogey to net DB. My question (not a Rules one - a Congu/handicap one) was about net single bogey - which would score 1 point in a stableford comp. YOU STILL HAVEN'T ANSWERED THE QUESTION about how credit for those scores, if made, can be given if the player doesn't hole out and the marker record it! . Click to expand...

rosecott

I think the OP wanted quite simple answers. Yes, the competition can be a qualifier even if there is a restriction on handicap, providing the player's score is entered on those holes where he would have received 2 shots and cards are processed using full handicap. There is no requirement to hole out when the player has lost a hole, except as mentioned above on holes where the player would have received 2 shots. Stableford and bogey results are converted to nett differentials for handicap purposes and the strokeplay/medal score achieved in a bogey competition is not relevant. On a par 72/CSS 72 course 36 stableford points and all square on bogey are "playing to handicap". Stableford Adjustment does not apply to bogey competitions.  

rosecott said: I think the OP wanted quite simple answers. Yes, the competition can be a qualifier even if there is a restriction on handicap, providing the player's score is entered on those holes where he would have received 2 shots and cards are processed using full handicap. There is no requirement to hole out when the player has lost a hole, except as mentioned above on holes where the player would have received 2 shots. Stableford and bogey results are converted to nett differentials for handicap purposes and the strokeplay/medal score achieved in a bogey competition is not relevant. On a par 72/CSS 72 course 36 stableford points and all square on bogey are "playing to handicap". Stableford Adjustment does not apply to bogey competitions. Click to expand...
chrisd said: I think that Foxholer just wound me up a little with his abrasive postings. Click to expand...
rosecott said: Be calm - you'll last longer. Click to expand...

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Lydia Ko ties Ayaka Furue for Tournament of Champions lead

N ew Zealand's Lydia Ko turned in a bogey-free, 5-under-par 67 to join Japan's Ayaka Furue atop the leaderboard after two rounds of the Hilton Grand Vacations Tournament of Champions on Friday in Orlando, Fla.

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Ko did team up with Australian Jason Day to win December's Grant Thornton Invitational, a mixed-team exhibition in Florida.

"I think Grant Thornton helped a lot. We did a lot of good work the week before with my coach flying over and spending some time here at Lake Nona," said Ko, who takes up residence in Orlando.

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Alexa Pano and Canadian Brooke Henderson each shot 70 Friday and are tied for fifth at 5 under. Pano, 19, broke through last August with her first career victory at the ISPS Handa World Invitational.

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Lydia Ko ties Ayaka Furue for Tournament of Champions lead

What Is A Bogey In Golf?

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What Is A Bogey

Learn what a bogey in golf is here.

What  Is A Bogey In Golf?

A bogey in golf is one of the most common terms, with golfers of all abilities producing at least a few every round.

But what is a bogey? We find out here.

What Is A Bogey In Golf?

A bogey is where a player takes one more shot than the par of the hole. So if a player is playing a par-3 and they make a four, or they are playing a par-4 and make five, it is a bogey.

Moreover, there are other variations of a bogey. For example, a double bogey is where you make two shots more than the par of the hole, and a triple bogey is where you take three shots more than the par.

Bogies are common during a round of golf, but sometimes it has been known for Tour players to complete a 72-hole tournament without a single dropped shot.

Related:  What Is A Birdie In Golf?

The first player to complete a 72-hole PGA Tour event without a bogey was Lee Trevino, who won the 1974 Greater New Orleans Open.

The longest bogey-free streak recorded on Tour came from Jin Young Ko in 2019, who eclipsed Tiger Woods' record of 110 holes without a bogey.

Making a bogey in the third round of the Women's Open Championship, she would then play (and win) the CP Women's Open with nothing worse than a par.

Related:  What Is Strokeplay In Golf?

Finally, on the ninth hole of the Cambia Portland Classic, Ko made a bogey. Ending her streak at 114  holes in a row.

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Texas Golf Blog

Bogey Golf VS Par Golf: Understanding The Difference

Bogey golf and par golf.

The difference between bogey and par golf can greatly affect your game. Par is the number of strokes an expert should take to finish a hole. Playing at this level is called par golf . Bogey golf is one stroke over par. To be a par golfer, one needs skill and practice. It’s a great starting point for beginners.

Aim to play the same strokes in each round. Bogey golfers can still progress by improving their strategy and avoiding double-bogies, which affect the scorecard.

Pro players find it hard to stay under par each round or hole. You shouldn’t compare yourself to experts. Don’t be too tough on yourself. Why settle for a birdie when you can be a bogey king?

slice-in-golf

What is Bogey Golf?

To understand the concept of bogey golf in golf, with the challenges a bogey golfer faces, you need to grasp the idea behind bogey golf. In short, bogey golf refers to playing a round of golf where you consistently score 1 over par on each hole. Now, let’s explore the sub-sections to gain further insight. First, we’ll dive into understanding the concept of bogey in golf, and then we’ll take a look at the challenges faced by golfers trying to attain bogey golf.

Understanding the Concept of Bogey in Golf

Bogey golf is a term used in golfing to describe a score of one over par on a hole . It means the golfer took one more shot than expected. For example, on a par 4 hole, a score of 5 would be a bogey.

This may sound negative, but it’s an improvement from double bogeys or worse for beginners and amateurs. Bogey golf varies based on skill level and course difficulty. Shooting bogeys isn’t a good performance for pros, but for newbies, it’s a positive milestone towards breaking par.

Understanding bogey golf provides context for understanding scores and performance in golf. Every stroke taken counts towards achieving goals – whether they’re aiming to shoot under par or improve their overall score.

So don’t forget to celebrate progress and milestones – embrace your inner bogey golfer and see where it takes you on the course!

Challenges Faced by a Bogey Golfer

Golfer with Average Score? Embrace the Chaos!

As a golfer with a bogey score, you face hurdles. Consistent ball striking and putting accuracy can be tough, leading to missed chances and higher scores. Focus for longer is also key to stopping errors that cost shots.

Adverse weather and course conditions, such as fast greens and uneven lies, can test your ability to control the ball’s trajectory. Thus, practicing technique and building mental stamina for success is important.

Different course layouts are another challenge, especially for golfers who rely on technology or playing style. However, cultivating flexibility in strategy formulation and execution can help overcome these obstacles.

Why aim for par? Embrace the chaos and aim for bogey golf!

What is Par Golf?

To understand the difference between bogey golf and par golf, you need to first know what par is in golf. With a focus on par on a golf course, this section explains the definition and importance of par along with the types of golfers and their scores. Get ready to explore more about this exciting world of golf!

Definition and Importance of Par on the Golf Course

Par sets the standard for a skilled golfer’s strokes per hole on a golf course. Course management and strategic shot selection help achieve par or lower scores. Comparing your score to par per hole is essential to measure performance. Par can be challenging, but accomplished players can achieve it over several rounds. The higher your score above par , the tougher the terrain. Power and precision are key, as each fairway and green demands unique shots.

Tour players compete in 72-hole tournaments ; their cumulative strokes relative to par decide the leaderboard. Handicap numbers level out differences between players’ abilities, so they can fairly compete. Jack Nicklaus is famous for his 18 major championships , achieved by driving long distances off tees and staying within par range for greens .

No matter your skill, your aiming score will show how much you need luck.

Types of Golfers and Their Aiming Score

Golf is a game of accuracy and precision. You must hit a ball using various clubs into a series of holes on a course. Golfers have different levels of skill, which affects their aiming score. Let’s have a look at these golfers:

Amateurs focus on hitting the ball hard and far. Pros focus on accuracy and precision. Recreational players enjoy the game for fun and relaxation.

Par is not the same for all golf courses. It changes based on the length and difficulty of each hole.

PGA.com states that professional golfers average 69-70 strokes per tournament round. That is under par compared to the expected average of 72 strokes.

Why not aim for greatness with par golf instead of just going with bogey golf?

Differences Between Bogey Golf and Par Golf

To understand the differences between bogey golf and par golf, you need to know about the scoring system and strategies and the mindset and approach of each type of golfer. In the following sections, we’ll briefly explore these sub-sections and their solutions to help you differentiate between them.

Scoring System and Strategies

Golf Scoring and Approach can be different between Bogey and Par Golf. Bogey requires one to three shots more than par, while Par is the same or less.

Scoring System:

  • Bogey Golf: One to three over par.
  • Par Golf: Same or under par.

Average Score Per Round:

  • Bogey Golf: 91-108 strokes likely.
  • Par Golf: 72 strokes on average (pro).

Mindset Strategy:

  • Bogey Golfers focus on minimizing part of the round. They practice swing planes, club speed, and short-game accuracy to compensate for lost ground.
  • Par Golfers concentrate on course management, shot-making, and placement strategies.

To reduce their score, golfers should use clubs with higher lofts, take tips from low-handicap players, and practice short-game skills. Attitude is key in golf!

Mindset and Approach

A Winning Mindset for Golf

When playing golf, there are two mindsets. Par golf is where players aim to hit each hole with the allowed number of strokes. Bogey golf is where players aim to hit each hole better than a certain number of swings. A winning approach requires focus and knowing your capabilities.

For par or lower, golfers must focus on precision and perfect shots. Every hole presents an opportunity to excel and reach the ‘perfect score.’ For bogey golf, it is about hitting over par by just one shot per hole. Focus on avoiding foul shots, and don’t push yourself too hard.

Keep expectations realistic to improve your golf experience and take steps towards self-improvement. Control your swings. For instance, I played at Pinehurst Country Club for middle school championships. It was tough, and I knew bogeying most holes was inevitable. But when they turned out great, it felt even more rewarding!

Remember, the only way to improve your game is to play more or hire a swing coach.

Tips to Improve Your Golf Game

The following tips can be useful to enhance your golf skills and technique and improve your mental preparation and focus when playing. In this section of the article “Tips to Improve Your Golf Game,” we will dive deep into enhancing your overall golf skills and technique, improving your mental preparation, and focusing on the course. These areas can be further examined in the sub-sections “Enhancing Your Skills and Technique” and “Mental Preparation and Focus.”

Enhancing Your Skills and Technique

Golf proficiency and acumen can be improved with more than just practicing . To become a proficient golfer, use many techniques and methods to increase skills and style. Perfect form, greater flexibility, better grip technique with clubs, understanding the course’s terrain, and using strategic shot selection are all necessary steps to improve your golf game.

To develop your swing, make small changes to your approach over time. Use lower-intensity swings with increased speed and flexibility-enhancing exercises to prevent muscle injuries during play. Mastering grip technique is essential; fingers should be interlocked to create power by using grip pressure across both hands – firm but not too tight.

A change in stance with golf equipment can lead to lower scores . When trying to improve golfers’ shots, standing tall is the key. This will improve their day-to-day performance and provide long-term value gains. They will also have greater agility and leadership within their leagues.

Amateur golfers should switch from aiming directly at the hole to a more strategic approach. When selecting a club, analyze each hole’s layout and terrain, including roughs, bunkers, and slopes. Place more emphasis on accuracy rather than distance.

Byron Nelson had an unbeaten record of 11 victories after winning his first. His amazing run lasted seven months during the 1945 golf season. This inspires today’s pro-golfers who want to build momentum after their first win and become strong players on the golf circuit. Get your head in the game and avoid sending golf balls into the rough!

Mental Preparation and Focus

Boost mental strength and concentration for an efficient golf game! Prepare mentally with visualization exercises, breathing techniques, and positive self-talk . Focus on one shot at a time to avoid distractions. Utilize mindfulness techniques to pay attention to each moment. Create pre-shot routines for an optimal state of concentration.

Utilize the “ out-cue ” approach to reduce overthinking. Review scorecards with a positive mindset, and don’t dwell on past mistakes . Improve mental strength with regular meditation sessions.

Pro tip: Take your time on each shot to evaluate situations calmly and reduce pressure during gameplay. The right golfing style is the one that gets the ball in the hole without causing harm.

Final Thoughts on Bogey Golf and Par Golf

Golfing Styles – Which is Right for You?

Are you ready to take a swing at golf? There are two main styles: bogey and par . Knowing their differences will help you decide which is best for you.

Bogey golfers typically score one stroke above par per hole. This style requires a solid swing and the ability to bounce back from mistakes. Par golfers can hit par on each hole and have mastered several parts of the game.

Think about your skills, attitude, and goals when deciding. If you want an easy-going game, bogey golf may be for you. However, par golf could be the way to go if you aim to play at a higher level.

Remember, both styles take time and energy to master. Have fun, though! Golf isn’t just about scores – it’s about having a great time with friends or family in great places. Get started on your golf journey today!

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is bogey golf? A: Bogey golf refers to a golfer’s performance on a course where they consistently score one above par on every hole.

Q: What is par golf? A: Par golf refers to a golfer’s performance on a course where they consistently score at or below par on every hole.

Q: What is a par golfer? A: A par golfer is someone who consistently shoots even par or better on a course.

Q: What is a bogey in golf? A: A bogey in golf refers to a score of one over par on a particular hole.

Q: Is it better to shoot bogey golf or par golf? A: It is generally better to shoot par golf because it means you are consistently playing at or above the expected level of performance on each hole. However, bogey golf is still a respectable level of play for many golfers.

Q: What does “par” mean on a golf course? A: “Par” is a term used in golf to describe the number of strokes an expert golfer must take to complete a hole or a round. For example, a par 3 hole is typically expected to be finished in 3 strokes, while a par 4 hole is expected to be finished in 4 strokes.

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What Do Those Golf Scoring Terms (Birdies, Bogeys, Pars) Mean?

So you're new to the game of golf and you keep hearing references to birdies and bogeys, eagles and pars. What are those things, anyway? What do those golf scoring terms mean ?

Those (and other terms) are all names for different types of scores on an individual golf hole.

Start With Par, Go From There to Understand Golf Score Names

When explaining golf scoring terms, start with par, because all the other names of golf scores are defined in relation to par. "Par" refers to the number of strokes an expert golfer is expected to need to complete the play of one hole on a golf course.

Golf holes of different lengths will require more or fewer strokes by a golfer. And regardless of length, the par number of a hole always allows for two putts. So a 150-yard hole is one on which the expert is expected to hit the green with his tee shot, take two putts, and, therefore, require three strokes to finish that hole. Such a hole is therefore called a par-3.

And every hole on a golf course is rated as either a par-3, a par-4 or a par-5 (par-6 holes also exist, but they are rare).

A very good golfer — or a very lucky golfer — might complete a hole in fewer strokes than the par (called "under par"). And of course, most of us are not "experts" at golf, and so on most holes we'll need more strokes than the par (called "over par").

That's where those other terms — birdies, eagles, bogeys, and so on — come into play. They describe a golfer's performance on a hole in relation to the hole's par:

  • A birdie is a score of 1-under par on a hole (for example, scoring 4 on a par-5).
  • A bogey is 1-over par on a hole.
  • An eagle is 2-under par on a hole.
  • A double bogey is 2-over par on a hole.
  • A double eagle (very rare) is 3-under par (also called an "albatross").
  • A triple bogey is 3-over par.

Given that a par-5 hole is the highest par most golfers will ever see, there is a limit to how far under par a golfer can go. But a hole-in-one — knocking the ball in the hole with your first shot — is also called an "ace." (On a par-5 hole, making an ace means a golfer is 4-under on that hole and, yes, golfers have a term for that, too: condor.)

Scores over par can keep going up, and you just keep adding to the prefix, as in quadruple bogey, quintuple bogey, and so on. Here's hoping that's knowledge you'll never need.

The Actual Number of Strokes That Result in These Golf Scores

Here's what these most-common golf scoring terms mean for holes with pars of 5, 4 and 3, in the actual number of strokes:

  • Double eagle: On a par-5, means you finished the hole in 2 strokes
  • Eagle: You finished the hole in 3 strokes
  • Birdie: You finished the hole in 4 strokes
  • Par: You finished the hole in 5 strokes
  • Bogey: You finished the hole in 6 strokes
  • Double bogey: You finished the hole in 7 strokes
  • Triple bogey: You finished the hole in 8 strokes
  • Double eagle: On a par-4, means you finished the hole in 1 stroke — a hole-in-one (very, very rare on par-4 holes)
  • Eagle: You finished the hole in 2 strokes
  • Birdie: You finished the hole in 3 strokes
  • Par: You finished the hole in 4 strokes
  • Bogey: You finished the hole in 5 strokes
  • Double bogey: You finished the hole in 6 strokes
  • Triple bogey: You finished the hole in 7 strokes
  • Double eagle: Double eagles are not possible on par-3 holes (a score of 3-under on a par-3 would be zero)
  • Eagle: You finished the hole in 1 stroke — a hole-in-one
  • Birdie: You finished the hole in 2 strokes
  • Par: You finished the hole in 3 strokes
  • Bogey: You finished the hole in 4 strokes
  • Double bogey: You finished the hole in 5 strokes
  • Triple bogey: You finished the hole in 6 strokes

Note that any hole-in-one or ace will be called by those terms, rather than by double eagle (on a par-4) or eagle (on a par-3). After all, why use double eagle or eagle when you can call it a hole-in-one?

Another note about the alternative term for "double eagle": Albatross is the preferred term in most of the golfing world; double eagle is the preferred term in the United States.

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Lydia Ko ties Ayaka Furue for Tournament of Champions lead

Lydia Ko tees off on the first hole at the Grant Thornton Invitational at Tiburon Golf Club in Naples on Friday, Dec. 8, 2023.

New Zealand's Lydia Ko turned in a bogey-free, 5-under-par 67 to join Japan's Ayaka Furue atop the leaderboard after two rounds of the Hilton Grand Vacations Tournament of Champions on Friday in Orlando, Fla.

Ko and Furue are at 8-under 136 through 36 holes at Lake Nona Golf and Country Club, two shots ahead of Scotland's Gemma Dryburgh and Mexico's Gaby Lopez. Furue held the first-round lead and shot a 1-under 71 Friday.

The Tournament of Champions is open to players who won an LPGA event over the past two seasons and does not feature a 36-hole cut. Ko, a former World No. 1, is in the field on the strength of three victories in 2022, but she is aiming to rebound after not winning on tour in 2023.

Ko did team up with Australian Jason Day to win December's Grant Thornton Invitational, a mixed-team exhibition in Florida.

"I think Grant Thornton helped a lot. We did a lot of good work the week before with my coach flying over and spending some time here at Lake Nona," said Ko, who takes up residence in Orlando.

"Even though it was a unique format at Grant Thornton, I think it just was really beneficial week for me to kind of be in positions where I was uncomfortable and still be able to commit to my shots."

On Friday, Ko had three birdies and an eagle at the par-5 ninth hole. She hit a 3-wood into the ninth green and had around 9 feet for eagle.

"Just tried to keep it simple and give myself a lot of good opportunities, and I was giving myself a lot of birdie chances, so I feel like I left a few out there," she said.

Furue took her first bogey of the tournament at the par-3 fourth and finished a quiet round with two birdies on the back nine. Dryburgh posted a 4-under 68 and Lopez shot a 1-under 71.

Alexa Pano and Canadian Brooke Henderson each shot 70 Friday and are tied for fifth at 5 under. Pano, 19, broke through last August with her first career victory at the ISPS Handa World Invitational.

"I turned pro for a reason, that I belonged out here and wanted to be out here," Pano said. "But it's just really proving that you belong out here I think can be tough. There is so many great players out here. You really got to prove yourself. I feel like I've done that, so I feel like now it's just continue to do that.

Nelly Korda (69), Rose Zhang (71) and Japan's Nasa Hataoka (70) are among the notable names tied for seventh at 4 under.

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Ko, Furue share lead at LPGA Tournament of Champions

New Zealand's Lydia Ko sank a 15-foot birdie putt on the closing hole to grab a share of the lead after Friday's second round of the LPGA Tournament of Champions.

The 26-year-old Seoul-born Kiwi's finish in the rain gave her a bogey-free, five-under par 67 to match Japan 's Ayaka Furue on eight-under 136 after 36 holes at Orlando's Lake Nona in the first event of the 2024 LPGA season.

"I played really solid," Ko said. "I felt like I hit the ball really well. I've been trying to take more ownership of making swings. Going to keep building and polishing up my game."

Furue, who led Thursday after an opening 65, fired a 71, answering a bogey at the par-3 fourth with birdies at the par-4 12th and par-5 15th.

Scotland's Gemma Dryburgh, whose only LPGA title came at the 2022 Japan Open, and Mexico 's Gaby Lopez shared third on 138 with Canada 's Brooke Henderson and American Alexa Pano both another stroke adrift.

Ko, a member at Lake Nona, birdied the par-5 second and par-4 eighth then closed the front side with an eagle at the par-5 ninth after blasting her second shot onto the green from the rough.

"I had a good lie and it wasn't the first time I had been in that rough," Ko said. "I was like, hey, what's the worst that can happen?

"I've been everywhere around the greens. That's the perks of being a member. I was like if I actually do hit a good shot it may just get up on the green. Ended up leaving myself a perfect spot just up the hill and it was nice to make the turn at 4-under."

Ko, a two-time major champion, won her most recent title at last year's Saudi Ladies International on the Ladies European Tour.

Ko's most recent of 19 LPGA triumphs came at the 2022 Tour Championship, although she captured last month's Grant Thornton Invitational mixed team event alongside Australian Jason Day.

Furue, an eight-time winner on the Japan Tour, qualified for the event with her victory at the 2022 Women's Scottish Open. She had nine top-10 LPGA finishes last year, the best a runner-up effort at the LPGA Match-Play.

Lopez made bogeys at seven and nine but she opened and closed the back nine with birdies and added another at the par-5 15th.

Dryburgh closed the front nine with back-to-back birdies, then answered her lone bogey at 12 with birdies at 15 and 18.

Henderson, who birdied three of the first five holes, sank a pitch-in birdie at the par-3 17th to pull within one stroke of the leaders, but fell back with a closing bogey.

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The American Express

La Quinta Country Club

ball went where?

The ball ended up where? You have to see this one from Adam Schenk

/content/dam/images/golfdigest/fullset/2023/2/Screenshot 2024-01-18 at 6.52.27 PM.png

Cheers, Adam Schenk.

The 31-year-old from Indiana was plodding along Thursday in the first round of the American Express in La Quinta, Calif., when the most bizarre thing of the day happened. Standing at three under par after 15 holes at the Pete Dye Stadium Course and hit his drive on the par-5, 578-yard 16th hole into the fairway.

Then it got weird.

From 264 yards out Schenk pushed his second shot right, the ball heading toward a small group of people outside the ropes. The television camera had difficulty finding the ball until one man in the gallery held up his drink to show that the ball had landed directly into his cup.

On the fly.

Schenk, of course, was awarded a free drop, got up and down for birdie and moved to four under par on the round. Unfortunately, he made double bogey on the par-3 17th hole, parred the last and shot two-under 70.

No word if Schenk replaced the man’s drink. At any rate, cheers all around.

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Dubai Invitational: Rory McIlroy retains lead despite making quadruple bogey during second round

Rory McIlroy shot a one-under-par 70 on Friday at the Dubai Invitational despite making a quadruple bogey seven at the eighth hole; Tommy Fleetwood is three shots off the lead; watch the third round from 7.30am on Friday live on Sky Sports Golf

Friday 12 January 2024 18:12, UK

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Rory McIlroy lands two in the water on same hole and wipes out four shot lead

Rory McIlroy retained the lead at the Dubai Invitational despite making a quadruple bogey during his second round at the DP World Tour event.

The Northern Irishman's two-shot advantage could have been far greater had it not been for the seven he made at the par-three eighth hole, where the world No 2 twice found the water.

McIlroy responded resolutely to the only dropped shots of his opening two rounds at the Dubai Creek Resort, making three birdies on the back nine to finish one-under for the round and move 10-under for the tournament.

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Denmark's Jeff Winther shot a five-under par 66 to move into a share of second alongside Germany's Yannik Paul, while McIlroy's Ryder Cup team-mate Tommy Fleetwood is among a group of five players at seven-under.

rory

Having produced a magnificent 62 on Thursday, McIlroy picked up where he left off as birdies at the third and fourth holes took him to -11.

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However, disaster struck at the 214-yard eighth as McIlroy came up short and found the water, before repeating the error from the drop zone, which was about 75 yards closer to the green.

After finding the green at the third attempt, McIlroy would two-putt for a seven that would temporarily take him out of the lead.

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A par to close out the front nine followed before McIlroy got back on track by using his power to make birdies at the par-five 10th and 13th holes.

There was to be no repeat of his par-three woes at the 16th, with McIlroy rolling in a 30-foot putt to make a final birdie, taking him back under par for the round.

"If I look at the other 17 holes that I played, I played very, very well again, hit some good iron shots and played not too dissimilarly to the way I played yesterday," McIlroy said.

"I maybe holed a couple more putts yesterday, but the conditions were getting a little trickier, the wind was up, the greens were firm.

par bogey golf competition

"And a couple of miscues on the eighth hole. I felt like I did well just to get my head back into it and play some solid golf on the way in.

"Everyone seemed to find it a little more difficult today than yesterday, so it's nice to go into the weekend still with the lead."

The tournament features a 72-hole stroke play tournament played alongside a three-day pro-am team event, with no cut and only the professionals playing on Sunday.

Having opened with a 66, Fleetwood, who started his round from the 10th, also had to be patient after two bogeys meant he had lost ground at the turn.

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The Englishman found a strong finish with three birdies in his final six holes to climb the leaderboard and establish himself as McIlroy's most notable challenger for the weekend.

England's Jordan Smith is also among the group on -7, along with Denmark's Thorbjorn Olesen and South African duo Thriston Lawrence and Zander Lombard.

Watch the Dubai Invitational throughout the week live on Sky Sports. Live coverage continues on Saturday from 7.30am on Sky Sports. Watch McIlroy in action throughout 2024 live on Sky Sports. Stream the PGA Tour, DP World Tour, LPGA Tour and more on NOW .

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Justin Lower Betting Profile: The American Express

Betting Profile

NAPA, CALIFORNIA - SEPTEMBER 16: Justin Lower of the United States lines up his putt on the 12th hole during the second round of the Fortinet Championship at Silverado Resort and Spa North course on September 16, 2022 in Napa, California. (Photo by Orlando Ramirez/Getty Images)

NAPA, CALIFORNIA - SEPTEMBER 16: Justin Lower of the United States lines up his putt on the 12th hole during the second round of the Fortinet Championship at Silverado Resort and Spa North course on September 16, 2022 in Napa, California. (Photo by Orlando Ramirez/Getty Images)

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Justin Lower seeks better fortunes this time around in the 2024 The American Express. He took 41st at the par-72 La Quinta Country Club in 2023.

The American Express Tournament & Course Info

  • Date: January 18-21, 2024
  • Location: La Quinta, California
  • Course: La Quinta Country Club
  • Par: 72 / 7,060 yards
  • Purse: $8.4M
  • Previous Winner: Jon Rahm

At The American Express

  • Lower's average finish has been 41st, and his average score -15, over his last two appearances at The American Express.
  • In 2023, Lower finished 41st (with a score of -15) in his most recent appearance at The American Express.
  • Jon Rahm won this tournament in 2023 with numbers of 1.727 in Strokes Gained: Off-the-Tee (13th in field), 4.03 in SG: Approach the Green (seventh), and -2.228 in SG: Putting (61st).
  • Rahm also posted numbers of 315.8 in average driving distance (11th in field), 83.33% in terms of greens in regulation (second), and 27 putts per round (25th).

Lower's Recent Performances

  • Lower has made the cut and finished in the top 20 on the leaderboard once over his last five appearances.
  • He's qualified for the weekend in four of his last five tournaments.
  • Over his last five tournaments, Lower has carded a score that's better than average in two of those outings.
  • He has carded an average score of -8 over his last five appearances.
  • Justin Lower has averaged 295.3 yards off the tee in his past five tournaments.
  • Lower has an average of -1.568 Strokes Gained: Putting in his past five tournaments.
  • Lower is averaging -2.237 Strokes Gained: Total in his past five tournaments.

Lower's Advanced Stats and Rankings

  • Lower had a Strokes Gained: Off the Tee average of -0.243 last season, which ranked 154th on TOUR. Meanwhile his average driving distance (294.2 yards) ranked 150th.
  • In terms of Strokes Gained: Approach last season, Lower sported a 0.073 mark that ranked 91st on TOUR. He ranked 114th with a 66.56% Greens in Regulation rate.
  • On the greens, Lower registered a 0.354 Strokes Gained: Putting mark last season, which ranked him 35th on TOUR, while he ranked 37th with a putts-per-round average of 28.49. He broke par 22.53% of the time (77th on TOUR).

Stats in the table above cover last FedExCup season.

Lower's Best Finishes

  • Last season Lower played 35 tournaments, earning one top-five finish and collecting three finishes in the top 10.
  • In those 35 events, he made the cut 19 times (54.3%).
  • Last season Lower had his best performance at the Rocket Mortgage Classic at Detroit Golf Club. He shot -19 and finished eighth (five shots back of the winner).
  • Lower compiled 430 points last season, which placed him 104th in the FedExCup standings.

Lower's Best Strokes Gained Performances

  • Last season Lower posted his best Strokes Gained: Off-the-Tee effort at the Fortinet Championship, ranking 17th in the field at 2.078. In that event, he finished fourth.
  • Lower's best Strokes Gained: Approach effort last season came at the AT&T Byron Nelson, where his 4.181 mark ranked 14th in the field.
  • In terms of Strokes Gained: Around-the-Green, Lower's best performance last season was at the Fortinet Championship, where his 3.181 mark ranked ninth in the field.
  • At the RBC Canadian Open in June 2023, Lower delivered a Strokes Gained: Putting mark of 7.898 (his best mark last season), which ranked second in the field. He finished 25th in that tournament.
  • Lower delivered his best Strokes Gained: Total mark last season (10.418) in June 2023 at the Rocket Mortgage Classic. That ranked eighth in the field.

Lower's Strokes Gained Rankings

Lower's results last season.

All stats in this article are accurate for Lower as of the start of The American Express.

Note: The PGA TOUR has created this story via a machine-learning model using data from ShotLink , powered by CDW, in addition to player performance data. While we strive for accuracy and quality, please note that the information provided may not be entirely error-free.

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WATCH: Adam Schenk lands shot inside fan's drink at The American Express tournament

Adam schenk apologized to the fan after landing his shot in the fan's drink.

adam-schenk-getty.jpg

Golfer Adam Schenk landed a shot in the most surprising of locations during Thursday's opening round of The American Express tournament. While playing the 16th hole, Schenk's approaching shot got away from the green and took a wild bounce.

Spectator Brad Harmeyer was sitting in a folding chair about 260 yards away when he ended up getting closer to the action than he ever imagined. The ball bounced off of his chest and landed in his cup.

Luckily, Harmeyer wasn't injured by the shot and didn't spill very much of his cocktail. The fan actually took the moment in stride and raised his glass to the crowd before taking a sip.

WHAT?! Adam Schenk just hit his ball into a spectator’s cup @TheAmExGolf ! pic.twitter.com/PKWzoilUYD — PGA TOUR (@PGATOUR) January 18, 2024

Schenk ended up coming over to apologize for the incident. He then gave a ball to Harmeyer that he was able to keep.

"I owe you a drink … I'm very sorry," Schenk said.

Harmeyer maintained that Schenk didn't need to apologize for the errant shot. Schenk ended up scoring a birdie from about 10 feet out on the hole.

The next hole wasn't as kind to Schenk as he recorded a double-bogey. Schenk finished the opening round with a two-under 70 and was tied for 98th place,

Regardless of how he finished the tournament, it will probably be a memory that both men will never forget.

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IMAGES

  1. Par Bogey: What are the rules of this unusual golf format?

    par bogey golf competition

  2. What are bogey competitions in golf?

    par bogey golf competition

  3. Golf Rule 32: Bogey, Par and Stableford Competitions

    par bogey golf competition

  4. A Few Tips To Help You Score Well In Your Next Bogey Competition

    par bogey golf competition

  5. What is a Bogey in Golf Means? Double, Triple Bogey and Competition

    par bogey golf competition

  6. Golf Scoring

    par bogey golf competition

COMMENTS

  1. Par Bogey: What are the rules of this unusual golf format?

    Welcome to Par Bogey - a game that can be played off scratch, with handicaps, and also in fourballs, foursomes, and team competitions. Rule 21.3 says a player, or side, wins or loses a hole in Par Bogey by either completing the hole in fewer strokes, or more strokes, than a "fixed target score for that hole set by the committee".

  2. What Are Bogey Competitions In Golf?

    What are bogey competitions in golf? In bogey competitions a player takes on the course itself in matchplay. The course scores bogey on each hole - bogey here is defined as in the original meaning of that word, the score that a good player should be expected to make on that hole.

  3. Golf Rule 32, Bogey Par And Stableford Competitions

    In bogey (or par) competition, the object is to beat a score of bogey (or par) on as many holes as possible. Example: Maurice scores a net 5 on the first hole, a par 5. In bogey competition, he would "win" the hole and go 1-up; in par competition, he would earn a halve and be all square.

  4. Bogey Golf: How to play this fun golf format for 1-4 players

    A bogey competition is a format of play where golfers compete against the course. In this format, each hole is played either as a bogey, par, or birdie relative to the player's own handicap. Why would someone play bogey golf instead of traditional formats?

  5. Par (golf scoring format)

    It is a stroke play format played against the course, with match play scoring based on the number of strokes taken on each hole compared to a fixed score, [1] usually the par or bogey; in this context, bogey is meant in the traditional sense as the score a good player would expect on the hole, usually par but occasionally one stroke more.

  6. Par/Bogey Competition in golf

    A par competition ( par / bogey competition) is a form of Stroke Play where the scoring is made as in 18- hole Match Play. The golfer plays a match against par on every hole (a virtual scratch golfer who plays pars at all holes). The opponent is the player's potential and there are only three outcomes for each hole: Win, Halve or Loss.

  7. Golf Formats: Alternatives to Stroke Play

    For club competitions, the committee will set a target score. In casual play, individuals can decide it for themselves. The most common ones are the set par (best for highly skilled players) and bogey (one over par and best for mid-handicappers). From there, each hole is either won, lost, or halved.

  8. Golf Rule 32: Bogey, par and stableford competitions

    Rule 32: Bogey, par and stableford competitions. One of the official 34 Rules of Golf.. 32-1: Conditions Bogey, par and Stableford competitions are forms of stroke play in which play is against a ...

  9. How to play Par Golf

    Aug 5, 2022 What is Par Golf and how do you play it? Here's what you need to know about this fun golf format Par Golf is a fun scoring format which combines elements of stroke play and match play competition. The concept of Par Golf is to play against the course, trying to better the score of par on many holes as possible. How to play Par Golf

  10. Bogey Golf: The Ultimate Strategy on How to Play Bogey Golf

    Key Takeaways Bogey golf involves scoring one stroke over par on each hole, a great accomplishment for amateur golfers. Double, triple, and quadruple bogeys indicate higher scores above par and should be minimized. The term 'bogey' originated in Scotland and England in the late 1800s, representing golf's original 'par' score.

  11. Golf Scoring Terms (Par, Bogey, Birdie, Eagle, Albatross, and More)

    Here are the USGA 's distance guidelines for men: Par-3 - Up to 250 yards Par-4 - 251 to 470 yards Par-5 - 401 to 690 yards For women, the USGA's distance guidelines are: Par-3 - Up to 210 yards Par-4 - 211 to 400 yards Par-5 - 401 to 575 yards The golf scoring term "Par" is also used to reference the combined par of a group of golf holes.

  12. What is a Bogey in Golf?

    A bogey competition in golf is a scoring format where players aim to do better than the 'bogey' score set for each hole. The bogey score is typically set at one stroke over par. In a bogey competition, golfers compete against the 'Bogey man' or the 'Course,' aiming to score as much under or at the bogey score as possible.

  13. Bogey Golf

    By Scott Miller Updated June 1, 2023 The scores in golf are represented by different names. One of them is bogey. This article deciphers the meaning of bogey and how it affects the game.

  14. The Competition

    Purpose of Rule: Rule 3 covers the three central elements of all golf competitions: Playing either match play or stroke play, Playing either as an individual or with a partner as part of a side, and; ... (Stableford, Maximum Score and Par/Bogey) that use a different scoring method. Rules 1-20 apply in these forms of play, as modified by Rule 21.

  15. Before the Competition

    a. Alternative Scoring Methods When the form of play is Stableford, Maximum Score or Par/Bogey, the Terms of the Competition may need to specify certain aspects in relation to how points will be scored, or the maximum number of strokes that a player can score on each hole. b. Stableford Stableford is a form of stroke play where points are awarded to a player for each hole by comparing the ...

  16. How to mark card in bogey competition for handicap

    Nov 3, 2011 Messages 845 Visit site I understand the scoring itself for a bogey comp ( ie net par is a + net bogey a -) but should you hole out each time anyway for handicap purposes or does a loss just count as a net bogey as worse case rather then a nett double bogey as worse case in stableford?

  17. Lydia Ko ties Ayaka Furue for Tournament of Champions lead

    Furue took her first bogey of the tournament at the par-3 fourth and finished a quiet round with two birdies on the back nine. Dryburgh posted a 4-under 68 and Lopez shot a 1-under 71.

  18. What Is A Bogey In Golf?

    A bogey is where a player takes one more shot than the par of the hole. So if a player is playing a par-3 and they make a four, or they are playing a par-4 and make five, it is a bogey. Moreover, there are other variations of a bogey. For example, a double bogey is where you make two shots more than the par of the hole, and a triple bogey is ...

  19. Bogey Golf VS Par Golf: Understanding The Difference

    Understanding the difference between bogey golf and par golf can help you set realistic goals and improve your overall performance on the course. Read on to learn more. ... PGA.com states that professional golfers average 69-70 strokes per tournament round. That is under par compared to the expected average of 72 strokes.

  20. Golf Score Terms: Birdies, Bogeys, Pars, More Meanings

    When explaining golf scoring terms, start with par, because all the other names of golf scores are defined in relation to par. "Par" refers to the number of strokes an expert golfer is expected to need to complete the play of one hole on a golf course. ... A bogey is 1-over par on a hole. An eagle is 2-under par on a hole. A double bogey is 2 ...

  21. Lydia Ko ties Ayaka Furue for Tournament of Champions lead

    Lydia Ko tees off on the first hole at the Grant Thornton Invitational at Tiburon Golf Club in Naples on Friday, Dec. 8, 2023. New Zealand's Lydia Ko turned in a bogey-free, 5-under-par 67 to join ...

  22. 2024 American Express leaderboard, scores: Sam Burns fires bogey-free

    2024 American Express leaderboard, scores: Sam Burns fires bogey-free 61 to command solo lead after Round 2 The American flirted with a 59 during his second round on the Nicklaus Tournament Course

  23. Dubai Desert Classic: Rory McIlroy blows strong start as Haotong Li

    Rory McIlroy bogeyed three of his last four holes in his opening round at the Dubai Desert Classic to give up a strong position; Haotong Li claimed a four-way share of the lead with a five-under ...

  24. 2024 Dubai Invitational: Rory McIlroy takes solo lead into weekend

    The margin could have been even wider for McIlroy, who started his day with birdies on Nos. 3-4 to quickly reach 11 under for the tournament. He seemed to be on cruise control up until the par-3 ...

  25. Ko, Furue share lead at LPGA Tournament of Champions

    The 26-year-old Seoul-born Kiwi's finish in the rain gave her a bogey-free, five-under par 67 to match Japan's Ayaka Furue on eight-under 136 after 36 holes at Orlando's Lake Nona in the first ...

  26. The ball ended up where? You have to see this one from Adam Schenk

    Schenk, of course, was awarded a free drop, got up and down for birdie and moved to four under par on the round. Unfortunately, he made double bogey on the par-3 17th hole, parred the last and ...

  27. Dubai Invitational: Rory McIlroy retains lead despite making quadruple

    Rory McIlroy shot a one-under-par 70 on Friday at the Dubai Invitational despite making a quadruple bogey seven at the eighth hole; Tommy Fleetwood is three shots off the lead; watch the third ...

  28. Justin Lower Betting Profile: The American Express

    Justin Lower seeks better fortunes this time around in the 2024 The American Express. He took 41st at the par-72 La Quinta Country Club in 2023.

  29. WATCH: Adam Schenk lands shot inside fan's drink at The American

    Adam Schenk apologized to the fan after landing his shot in the fan's drink. Golfer Adam Schenk landed a shot in the most surprising of locations during Thursday's opening round of The American ...