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bo•gey

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Definition of bogey noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

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define british bogey

Also possibly related to Irish bagairt ( “ threat ” ) .

Golf meaning from the devil as an imaginary player.

Noun [ edit ]

bogey ( plural bogeys )

  • ( archaic , often capitalized , usually with definite article ) The Devil . Synonyms: see Thesaurus: Satan
  • A ghost , goblin , or other hostile supernatural creature . Synonym: goblin
  • 2018 November 18, Phil McNulty, “England 2 - 1 Croatia”, in BBC Sport ‎ [2] : England could have been forgiven for believing the fates were against them as they trailed to their League A Group Four opponents, who have become something of a bogey side over the years.
  • 1990 , Peter Hopkirk , The Great Game , Folio Society, published 2010 , page 54 : If one man could be said to be responsible for the creation of the Russian bogy , it was a much-decorated British general named Sir Robert Wilson.
  • ( engineering ) A standard of performance set up as a mark to be aimed at in competition.
  • 1987 , Greg Bear , “ Lacrimosa Dies Illa ! ”, in The Forge of God (science fiction), →ISBN , →OCLC , page 83 : He stood on the sand near the gravel road that passed within two miles of the site of the disintegrated bogey , binoculars hanging on a leather strap from his neck, face streaming with sweat under the brim of his hat... Army and government trucks passed along the road every few minutes, some bearing radiation stickers; many of those outward bound, he knew, carried fragments of the bogey . He was not privy to what they were finding.
  • 1986 , Jim Cash, Jack Epps Jr., Top Gun (motion picture), spoken by Cougar: God dammit, Mustang! This is Ghost Rider 117. This bogey is all over me. He's got missile lock on me. Do I have permission to fire?
  • ( golf ) A score of one over par on a hole . Coordinate terms: buzzard , par , birdie , eagle , albatross , condor , ostrich
  • ( UK ) Alternative form of booger : a piece of mucus in or removed from the nostril .

Related terms [ edit ]

  • double bogey
  • triple bogey

Translations [ edit ]

Verb [ edit ].

bogey ( third-person singular simple present bogeys , present participle bogeying , simple past and past participle bogeyed )

  • ( golf ) To make a bogey.

Etymology 2 [ edit ]

  • ( UK , engineering ) A bog-standard ( representative ) specimen taken from the center of production .

Etymology 3 [ edit ]

From Dharug bugi- ( “ to bathe, dive ” ) .

  • ( Australia ) To swim ; to bathe . [from 18th c.]
  • 1994 , Rita Huggins & Jackie Huggins , Auntie Rita , in Heiss & Minter, Macquarie PEN Anthology of Aboriginal Literature , Allen & Unwin 2008, p. 151: My mother would use leaves from trees to make soap for washing our bodies with, and unfortunately for us kids there was no excuse not to take a bogey .

Etymology 4 [ edit ]

A variant of bogie .

  • Alternative spelling of bogie ( “ one of two sets of wheels under a locomotive or railcar ; also, a structure with axles and wheels under a locomotive, railcar, or semi which provides support and reduces vibration for the vehicle ” )
  • Alternative spelling of bogie ( “ hand-operated truck or trolley ” )

Notes [ edit ]

  • ^ United States Department of Defense Air Land Sea Application Center (May 2020), “Multi-service Brevity Codes”, in Brevity: Multi-service Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Multi-service Brevity Codes ‎ [1] , archived from the original on 2021-06-30 , page 6: “BOGEY: [A/A] [S/A] [SO] A CONTACT whose identity is unknown.”

References [ edit ]

  • “ bogey ”, in Lexico , Dictionary.com ; Oxford University Press , 2019–2022.
  • “ bogey ”, in OneLook Dictionary Search .

Finnish [ edit ]

Etymology [ edit ].

From English bogey .

  • IPA ( key ) : /ˈboɡi/ , [ˈbo̞ɡi]
  • Syllabification ( key ) : bo‧gey
  • ( golf ) bogey

Declension [ edit ]

  • Seldom inflected in cases other than genitive singular ( bogeyn ) or nominative plural ( bogeyt ).
  • For other inflected forms use bogi .

Synonyms [ edit ]

French [ edit ].

Borrowed from English bogey .

  • ( France ) IPA ( key ) : /bɔ.ɡɛ/
  • ( Quebec ) IPA ( key ) : /bɔ.ɡe/ , /bɔ.ɡi/

bogey   m ( plural bogeys )

Coordinate terms [ edit ]

define british bogey

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Bogey to Blow-Up

There is quite a history behind the golfing terms bogey, par, birdie, eagle and albatross.

Bogey and par were central to the development of handicapping, pioneered by the LGU . The modern meaning of three of the terms - bogey, birdie and eagle - comes from their use in USA.

Bogey Par Birdie Eagle Albatross   Condor

"Bogey" was the first stroke system, developed in England at the end of the 19th Century. The full history is given in Robert Browning's History of Golf 1955 .

In 1890 Mr Hugh Rotherham Secretary of the Coventry Golf Club conceived the idea of standardising the number of shots at each hole that a good golfer should take, which he called the 'ground score.'

GreatYarmouth01

A 'bogle' was a Scottish goblin as far back as the 16th Century and a Bogey-man was a widely used term for a goblin or devil. Golfers of the time considered they were playing a Mister Bogey when measuring themselves against the bogey score. This allowed the introduction of bogey competitions, which we would call handicap competitions or stablefords. 

On 2nd January 1892, The Field reported that 'a novelty was introduced in the shape of a bogey tournament for a prize. ... Fourteen couples started but the bogey defeated them all.'

In 1892, Colonel Seely-Vidal, the Hon Secretary of the United Servic es Club at Gosport, also worked out the 'bogey' for his course. The United Club was a services club and all the members had a military rank. They could not measure themselves against a 'Mister' Bogey or have him as a member, so 'he' was given the honorary rank of Colonel. Thus the term 'Colonel Bogey' was born. 

Later, in the middle of 20th century, bogey was used as the term of one above par.

Par is derived from the stock exchange term that a stock may be above or below its normal or 'par' figure. In 1870, Mr AH Doleman, a golf writer, asked the golf professionals David Strath and James Anderson, what score would win 'The Belt', then the winning trophy for 'The Open', at Prestwick, where it was first held annually from 1861 to 1870. Strath and Anderson said that perfect play should produce a score of 49 for Prestwick's twelve holes. Mr Doleman called this 'par' for Prestwick and subsequently Young Tom Morris won with a score of two strokes 'over par' for the three rounds of 36 holes.

TomMorrisJnr04

In 1911, the United States Golf Association (Men) of the day laid down the following very modern distances for determining par:

As golf developed, scores were coming down, but many old British courses did not adjust their courses or their bogey scores, which meant good golfers and all the professionals were achieving lower than a bogey score. This meant the US had an up-to-date national standard of distances for holes, while the British bogey ratings were determined by each club and were no longer appropriate for professionals. The Americans began referring to one over par as a bogey, much to the British chagrin.

By 1914, British golf magazines were agitating for a ratings system similar to the US. However the Great War 1914-18 intervened and it was not until 1925 that a Golf Unions' Joint Advisory Committee of the British Isles was formed to assign Standard Scratch Scores (SSS), to golf courses in Great Britain and Ireland. Today, this committee is known as the Council of National Golf Unions (CONGU). It is the Golf Unions of each country (and not the Royal and Ancient) who determine pars and handicaps.

"Birdie", meaning a score of one stroke under Par, comes from the early 20th century American slang term "bird", meaning anything excellent. The September 1911 edition of Maclean Magazine described a golf shot as - '"bird" straight down the course, about two hundred and fifteen yards.'  

The Country Club in Atlantic City lay claim to the first use of the word 'birdie' itself, as mentioned on the USGA website. In 1962 the US greenkeepers' magazine reported a conversation with A B Smith. He recounted that, in 1898/9, he and his brother, William P Smith, and their friend, George A Crump, who later built Pine Valley, were playing the par-four second hole at Atlantic City, when Ab Smith's second shot went within inches of the hole. Smith said "That was a bird of shot" and claimed he should get double money if he won with one under par, which was agreed. He duly holed his putt to win with one under par and the three of them thereafter referred to such a score as a "birdie". The Atlantic City Club date the event to 1903.

AtlanticCityCC Birdie

Sea Eagle Fife

Ab Smith ( see Birdie above ) said that his group referred to two under as an 'eagle'.

By 1919 the term was being introduced to Britain, as when Mr H D Gaunt's explained the use of 'birdie' and 'eagle' that he met in Canada . For many years, eagle was always introduced as American terms, as in 1922 when  Cecil (Cecilia) Leitch described a putt for a 3 on a par-5 hole as 'securing what is known in American golfing parlance as an "eagle"' (Golf XII 1922 p 202). 

  Albatross

Albatross is the term for three under par and is a continuation of the birdie and eagle theme, but is in fact a British term. Ab Smith said his group used the phrase 'double eagle' for three under ( see Birdie above ), which is still the term most Americans and the name for their Double Eagle Club  (membership by invitation only).

Three under par is a very rare score and an albatross is a very rare bird. The exact origin is unclear but the first known reference in 1929 indicates that it had been in use for some time before then.  John G Ridland, who scored an 'albatross' in India in 1934 , theorized that it was the introduction of steel shafted clubs in 1920s which made this score common enough to necessitate a name for it. 

Durban CC Hole 18 L

Durban Country Club 18th Hole site of first recorded albatross, a hole-in-one on 271 yard par-4

The first ‘albatross’ score reported as such in the press is from South Africa when E E Wooler scored a hole-in-one in the summer of 1931 on the 18th hole of the Durban Country Club which is a par-4. It cost £40 in drinks but, had he known that he was making history, he would not have minded. 

More details of the first albatrosses, are given in   The Albatross has Landed  in News section. 

A 'condor' in golf is a score of four (4!) under par. This can be achieved by scoring a hole-in-one on a par-5 hole, or by taking two strokes on a par-6 hole, which are themselves as rare as hen's teeth. Until recently, the idea of a condor was not considered to be possible and certainly few people were aware that anyone had scored one.

Golfing condors have been recorded six times around the world over the last 60 years in the USA, the UK and Australia. Until 2020, they were all par-5 'aces'.   More details can be found here .

The Whaup and Double Bogeys

No standard terms for 2 or 3 or more over Par have emerged. They are just double and triple Bogeys. Depending upon how good you are, anything over 7, 8 or 9 will be a ‘Blow-up’ or a ‘Disaster’.

Joyce Wethered once suggested that a hole-in-one should be called a Curlew, known in Scottish as a 'Whaup', which, though fitting, did not catch on. 

It seems that golfing terms came into popular use in much the same way as you find new words being invented and used on the Internet. If they sound good, people start using them. What we do not hear about are all the terms, such as beantops , that never made it because they did not catch on. Only the future can tell which of the terms that we create will still be in use in a hundred years time.

Updated to add Condor 18th July 2023

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Tracing the Origins of Bogey as a Golf Term

The Story Behind the Unusual Way 'Bogey' Entered the Golf Lexicon

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You better watch out or the Bogey Man's gonna get you! The Bogey Man must have been a golfer, because he lent his name to a golf score of 1-over par .

At least, that's what the golf scoring term "bogey" means today: the definition of bogey is a stroke total on a single gole that is one stroke higher than that hole's par rating. If the hole is a par-4 , and you make a score of five, that's a bogey. ("Bogey" has sometimes, in its history, been spelled "bogie," but that is considered a misspelling today.)

But the origins of "bogey" include the fact that it was originally used by golfers similar to the way that we use "par" today. Par and bogey were not necessarily interchangeable terms, but a golf hole's par rating and bogey rating were often the same.

We must go back to British golf in the late 1800s to see how bogey emerged as a golf term.

Yes, Golf's Bogey Is Related to 'the Bogey Man'

According to the USGA Museum, the "Bogey Man" was a character in a British dancehall song of the late 19th Century, a song titled Here Comes the Bogey Man . And yes, that was the bogey man (many today pronounce it "boogie man"). He lived in the shadows and said in song, "I'm the Bogey Man, catch me if you can."

British golfers by at least the 1880s developed a way of rating golf holes: how many strokes should it take to play the hole? This is what we call "par" today, but at that time, when scores were much higher throughout golf than they are today, the number was originally called the "ground score." And "ground score" wasn't what a great golfer playing the hole well would score, but rather what a skilled amateur would be expected to make playing the hole without any large mistakes.

So British golfers of that era tried to match or beat the "ground score" for a hole. Around 1890, according to The Historical Dictionary of Golfing Terms , a certain Charles Wellman, playing golf at Great Yarmouth in England, exclaimed one day on the links that the ground score was "a regular Bogey Man," referring to the song.

As the lyrics of the song said, "I'm the Bogey Many, catch me if you can," golfers, thanks to Mr. Wellman, began thinking of a hole's ground score as "chasing the bogey man."

Hello, Colonel Bogey

In very short order after "bogey" replaced "ground score" in the golfer's lexicon, golfers invented an imaginary character to personify the golf score. That character was "Colonel Bogey." The Historical Dictionary of Golfing Terms cites an 1892 newspaper article that refers to Colonel Bogey, so the character was well-known within just a year or two of the origins of "bogey" itself.

Golfers trying to beat the bogey score were trying to "beat Colonel Bogey." That character appeared in song in the Colonel Bogey March , published in 1913, and, as the photo on this page shows, appeared on golf products.

(The Colonel Bogey March , by the way, was later made instantly recognizable as the famous music in the movie The Bridge on the River Kwai .)

When the Meanings of Bogey and Par Diverged

While that was happening in British golf in the late 1800s and early 1900s, in American golf the term "par" was just entering the golf lexicon in the early 1900s. The USGA began officially using par to rate golf holes and golf courses in 1911.

But golf scores had improved in the years since "bogey" first appeared. The USGA thus defined "par" as the score an expert golfer, playing the hole well, should be expected to achieve. So in the first years in which par and bogey were both in use in the United States, their meanings began to diverge. There was a brief time when some golf courses listed both a hole's par rating and its bogey rating, and sometimes those numbers were the same. More commonly over time, however, the bogey rating began being listed as one stroke higher than the par rating.

And that's how we got to where we are today. Par is the score an expert golfer is expected to make on a hole; bogey is 1-over par.

  • What Is a Bogey? Definition of the Golf Score
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  • What Is a 'Double Bogey' Score in Golf?
  • Birdie: What This Scoring Term Means in Golf
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  • What Is a Bogey Golfer?
  • What Does a Score of Even Par Mean in Golf?
  • The Albatross in Golf: Explaining This Rare Bird's Meaning and Origin
  • How Golf Handicaps Work: Overview of Their Role and Function
  • What You Need to Know About Golf's World Handicap System
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English pronunciation of bogey

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(English pronunciations of bogey from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus and from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary , both sources © Cambridge University Press)

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Definition of bogie

 (Entry 1 of 2)

less common spelling of bogey entry 1

Word History

origin unknown

1835, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Dictionary Entries Near bogie

bogie engine

Cite this Entry

“Bogie.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary , Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bogie. Accessed 14 Jan. 2024.

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What does bogey mean in golf?

Confusingly, it has two different golfing meanings, one arising from the other

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What does bogey mean in golf?

Confusingly, the word bogey has two different golfing meanings, the more modern one arising from the older one. But both meanings are still used

The answer to ‘what does bogey mean in golf’ depends upon the context. It also depends upon what period of history you are talking about.

The original meaning of bogey was that it was the score that a very good golfer should aim to make. This was distinct from par, a term which was also around, but which referred to the ’perfect’ score on a hole.

The concept of bogey was invented in the 1890s although it was then known as the ‘ground score’ not ‘bogey’.

Par was the more popular measurement in the US, whereas bogey was in vogue in the UK.

For example, when Dr Frank  Stableford , devised what we now know as the Stableford scoring system, points were awarded against bogey, not par. Thus to get 2pts on a hole you had to match bogey not par under Dr Stableford’s original system

Par as a golfing term dates came into regular use in the early 1900s. Par also assigns a target score to each hole, but par was calculated more scientifically, by dividing up holes by their length.

Bogey was harder to define, as it relied upon an assessment of difficulty by the club themselves, and so its implementation, and the standard required, could vary between clubs.

As scores came down, the better golfers would sometimes aim for par rather than bogey. Bogey scores for the hardest holes were often a shot higher than par. A few of the more traditional golf clubs to this day still have a bogey score and a par score on their scorecard, and the total bogey score will normally be around 5-6 shots higher than the par one.

Although the par and bogey scores of each hole were normally the same, sometimes the bogey score would be one over par. From this came the modern definition that bogey is a score of one over par on a hole.

But the older definition of bogey, as a target score, still lives on in bogey competitions .

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Synonyms of 'bogey' in British English

Additional synonyms, synonyms of 'bogey' in american english, browse alphabetically bogey.

  • bog something or someone down
  • bogged down
  • All ENGLISH synonyms that begin with 'B'

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Definitions

From the american heritage® dictionary of the english language, 5th edition..

  • noun An evil or mischievous spirit; a hobgoblin.
  • noun A cause of annoyance or harassment.
  • noun A golf score of one stroke over par.
  • noun Chiefly British The number of strokes that a good player is likely to need to finish a golf hole or course.
  • noun Slang An unidentified flying aircraft.
  • noun Slang A detective or police officer.
  • noun Chiefly British Slang A piece of dried or semisolid nasal mucus; a booger.
  • transitive verb To play (a hole in golf) scoring one stroke over par.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun See bogy, bogyism.
  • noun See bogie .

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A goblin; a bugbear.
  • noun (Golf) a score one stroke over par for a hole; formerly, the definition of bogey was the same as that now used for par , i.e., an ideal score or number of strokes, for each hole, against which players compete; -- it was said to be so called because assumed to be the score of an imaginary first-rate player called Colonel Bogey. Now the standard score is called par .
  • noun (Mil.) an unidentified aircraft; in combat situations, such craft not identified as friendly are assumed to be hostile.

from Wiktionary , Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun archaic The Devil .
  • noun An object of terror ; a bugbear .
  • noun One of two sets of wheels under a train car.
  • noun UK A piece of solid or semisolid mucus in or removed from the nostril .
  • noun engineering A representative specimen, taken from the centre a spread of production - a sample with bogey (typical) characteristics.
  • noun engineering a standard of performance set up as a mark to be aimed at in competition.
  • noun military slang An unidentified aircraft, especially as observed as a spot on a radar screen, and often suspected to be hostile. (Also sometimes used as a synonym for bandit - an enemy aircraft)
  • noun golf A score of one over par in golf.
  • verb golf To make a bogey.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun an evil spirit
  • noun an unidentified (and possibly enemy) aircraft
  • verb to shoot in one stroke over par
  • noun (golf) a score of one stroke over par on a hole

Etymologies

From the american heritage® dictionary of the english language, 4th edition.

define british bogey

Help support Wordnik (and make this page ad-free) by adopting the word bogey .

He again started sluggishly in the final round, taking bogey from the rough on No. 1 and having to save par from thick grass short of the green at No. 2.

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Jerry Kelly was at 2 over until he took double bogey from the front of the 14th green, then rinsed one in the pond short of the 15th green for another bogey.

Appleby one up on Woods after rough day at Masters 2007

Paul Casey shot a 72 and was at 5-over 215 with Stephen Ames (73), Justin Rose (73) and Bubba Watson (75), who made a triple bogey from the left side of the ninth green but steadied himself with pars and a lone bogey the rest of the way.

Woods makes move; Baddeley leads U.S. Open 2007

After Woods made bogey from a greenside bunker at No. 18, missing a 10-foot putt, DiMarco still had to make his 5-footer to force a playoff.

USATODAY.com - Tiger sinks DiMarco with birdie in Masters playoff 2005

He reeled off six consecutive pars before taking bogey from a greenside bunker at No. 8.

USATODAY.com - Goosen ganders second U.S. Open victory 2004

Lawrie could have played cautiously, laid up with a wedge on his second shot and then hit another, shorter wedge shot into the green for a certain bogey 5 to secure his win.

Claret Jug back at home 1999

Parry actually led the championship with seven holes to play until he made a triple bogey from the rough on No. 12, which enabled Van de Velde to regain the lead.

Paul Lawrie wins British Open 1999

- U.S. Open champion Lee Janzen was at 4-under until he took a double bogey from the back bunker on the par-3 12th.

Olazabal wins second green jacket 1999

She communist bogey is an American stunt to distract the attention of the people of

Articles written by Nelson Mandela for Liberation, 1955-59 1959

You go through the different floors of that factory and come to where they are making big electrical generators and you see guards around with their rifles because Russia's bogey is that somebody is trying to copy them all the time and steal their secrets.

Our Times Viewed From a World Perspective 1934

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synonyms (47)

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  • Frankenstein
  • Mumbo Jumbo
  • combat plane
  • enemy aircraft
  • fee-faw-fum
  • holy terror

hypernyms (4)

Words that are more generic or abstract.

  • evil spirit

same context (6)

Words that are found in similar contexts, variants (1), relateds (1).

  • double bogey

cross-references (2)

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johnmperry commented on the word bogey

UK vernacular for US booger

define british bogey

whichbe commented on the word bogey

Evil Booger Intends Harm

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a score of one stroke over par on a hole.

par 1 (def. 4) .

bogy 1 (defs. 1-3) .

Also bo·gy, bo·gie . Military . an unidentified aircraft or missile, especially one detected as a blip on a radar screen.

Golf . to make a bogey on (a hole): Arnold Palmer bogeyed the 18th hole.

Origin of bogey

Other definitions for bogey (2 of 3).

a swim; bathe.

to swim; bathe.

Other definitions for bogey (3 of 3)

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2024

How to use bogey in a sentence

Again, all those who warn the world concerning eventualities they conceive to be a danger are not accused of creating bogeys.

And so while you were in Japan, you would be actually looking for hot bogeys?

Many such bogeys are, of course, passed into each tunnel, and as many tunnels as required may be constructed.

We are not afraid of bogeys, nor do we dread the silence and the dark.

The age was too educated for medieval monsters and magic, but not educated enough to reject ghosts and other bogeys.

British Dictionary definitions for bogey (1 of 2)

/ ( ˈbəʊɡɪ ) /

an evil or mischievous spirit

something that worries or annoys

a score of one stroke over par on a hole : Compare par (def. 5)

obsolete a standard score for a hole or course, regarded as one that a good player should make

slang a piece of dried mucus discharged from the nose

air force slang an unidentified or hostile aircraft

slang a detective; policeman

(tr) golf to play (a hole) in one stroke over par

British Dictionary definitions for bogey (2 of 2)

to bathe or swim

a bathe or swim

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

IMAGES

  1. What is a bogey in golf? Explained

    define british bogey

  2. 9780902672307: Encyclopaedia of British Bogies

    define british bogey

  3. What Is A Bogey In Golf?

    define british bogey

  4. What is a Bogey in Golf means?

    define british bogey

  5. Randon's Ramblings : YELLOW-BROWED WARBLER OFF BRITISH BOGEY BIRD LIST

    define british bogey

  6. The Bogey in Golf: Definition and Examples of Scores

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COMMENTS

  1. BOGEY

    noun uk / ˈbəʊ.ɡi / us / ˈboʊ.ɡi / bogey noun (GOLF) Add to word list [ C ] in golf, the act of getting the ball into the hole in one shot (= hit) more than par (= the expected number) for that hole SMART Vocabulary: related words and phrases Golf approach shot best ball better ball birdie bogie bunker caddy carry driver fairway golfing greenside

  2. BOGEY definition and meaning

    bogey in British English or bogy (ˈbəʊɡɪ ) noun 1. an evil or mischievous spirit 2. something that worries or annoys 3. golf a. a score of one stroke over par on a hole Compare par (sense 5) b. obsolete a standard score for a hole or course, regarded as one that a good player should make 4. slang a piece of dried mucus discharged from the nose

  3. Bogey Definition & Meaning

    bogey 1 of 3 noun (1) bo· gey variants or less commonly bogie or bogy plural bogeys also bogies Synonyms of bogey 1 ˈbu̇-gē ˈbō-, ˈbü- : specter, phantom 2 ˈbō-gē, also ˈbu̇-, or ˈbü- : a source of fear, perplexity, or harassment 3 \ ˈbō- gē \ golf a : one stroke over par on a hole made a bogey on the second hole b

  4. BOGEY Definition & Usage Examples

    1 [ boh-gee; for 2 also boog-ee, boo-gee ] show ipa See synonyms for bogey on Thesaurus.com noun, plural bo·geys. Golf. a score of one stroke over par on a hole. par 1 (def. 4). bogy 1 (defs. 1-3). Also bo·gy, bo·gie . Military. an unidentified aircraft or missile, especially one detected as a blip on a radar screen. bogie 1.

  5. BOGEY definition in American English

    (ˈboʊgi ; for 1, usually ˈbʊgi ) noun Word forms: plural ˈbogeys 1. bogy 1 2. Golf a. par, esp. for an average player a former meaning b. one stroke more than par on a hole verb transitive Word forms: ˈbogeyed or ˈbogeying US 3. Golf to score one over par on (a given hole) Webster's New World College Dictionary, 4th Edition.

  6. Bogey

    Chiefly British Slang A piece of dried or semisolid nasal mucus; a booger. tr.v. bo·geyed, bo·gey·ing, bo·geys To play (a hole in golf) scoring one stroke over par. [Possibly variant of bogle .] American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

  7. Bogey Definition & Meaning

    Britannica Dictionary definition of BOGEY. [+ object] golf. : to score a bogey on (a hole) She birdied the first hole but bogeyed the second hole. BOGEY meaning: 1 : a score that is one more than the official standard score for a particular hole a score of one stroke over par on a hole; 2 : something that causes fear or worry.

  8. bogey noun

    (also bogy) (both British English) ( North American English booger) (informal) a piece of dried mucus from inside your nose (also bogy) a bogeyman (= an imaginary evil spirit that is used to frighten children)

  9. Bogeyman

    The bogeyman ( / ˈboʊɡimæn /; also spelled or known as bogyman, [1] bogy, [1] bogey, [1] and, in North American English, also boogeyman) [1] is a mythical creature used by adults to frighten children into good behaviour.

  10. bogey

    Noun [ edit] bogey (plural bogeys) ( Australia) A swim or bathe; a bath. [from 19th c.] 1994, Rita Huggins & Jackie Huggins, Auntie Rita, in Heiss & Minter, Macquarie PEN Anthology of Aboriginal Literature, Allen & Unwin 2008, p. 151: My mother would use leaves from trees to make soap for washing our bodies with, and unfortunately for us kids ...

  11. Par, Bogey, Birdie, Eagle, Albatross

    Bogey to Blow-Up. There is quite a history behind the golfing terms bogey, par, birdie, eagle and albatross. Bogey and par were central to the development of handicapping, pioneered by the LGU. The modern meaning of three of the terms - bogey, birdie and eagle - comes from their use in USA. Bogey Par Birdie Eagle Albatross Condor.

  12. How Bogey Became a Golf Term

    The Bogey Man must have been a golfer, because he lent his name to a golf score of 1-over par . At least, that's what the golf scoring term "bogey" means today: the definition of bogey is a stroke total on a single gole that is one stroke higher than that hole's par rating. If the hole is a par-4, and you make a score of five, that's a bogey.

  13. BOGY

    BOGY definition: 1. → bogey 2. → bogey. Learn more.

  14. bogey

    UK:* /ˈbəʊɡɪ/ in Spanish | in French | in Italian | English synonyms | English Usage | Conjugator | in context | images Inflections of ' bogey ' ( n ): bogeys npl (US & UK) bogies npl (UK) Inflections of ' bogey ' ( v ): ( ⇒ conjugate) bogeys v 3rd person singular bogeying v pres p

  15. How to pronounce BOGEY in English

    How to pronounce bogey. How to say bogey. Listen to the audio pronunciation in the Cambridge English Dictionary. Learn more.

  16. Bogie Definition & Meaning

    1 : a low strongly built cart 2 a chiefly British : a swiveling railway truck b : the driving-wheel assembly consisting of the rear four wheels of a 6-wheel automotive truck 3 : a small supporting or aligning wheel (as on the inside perimeter of a tank tread) bogie 2 of 2 noun (2) bo· gie less common spelling of bogey entry 1 1 ˈbu̇-gē ˈbō-, ˈbü-

  17. bogey

    From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English Related topics: Golf, Folklore bo‧gey, bogie /ˈbəʊɡi $ ˈboʊɡi/ noun [ countable] 1 technical when you take one more shot than par (=the usual number of shots) to get the ball into the hole in golf → birdie, eagle 2 a problem or difficult situation that makes you feel anxious bogey of the bogey of r...

  18. Bogey Definition & Meaning

    noun bogeys, bogies An evil or mischievous spirit; a hobgoblin. American Heritage Bogy. Webster's New World Par, esp. for an average player. Webster's New World A cause of annoyance or harassment. American Heritage One stroke more than par on a hole. Webster's New World Similar definitions More Noun Definitions (9) Synonyms: bogie bogy visitant

  19. What does bogey mean in golf?

    Bogey was harder to define, as it relied upon an assessment of difficulty by the club themselves, and so its implementation, and the standard required, could vary between clubs. As scores came down, the better golfers would sometimes aim for par rather than bogey. Bogey scores for the hardest holes were often a shot higher than par.

  20. Synonyms of 'bogey' in British English

    Synonyms for BOGEY in English: bugbear, bête noire, horror, nightmare, bugaboo, spirit, ghost, phantom, spectre, spook, …

  21. What is Britain's Post Office scandal?

    One of Britain's biggest miscarriages of justice, the wrongful conviction of hundreds of Post Office workers due to faulty software, has exploded into the public domain following a TV drama ...

  22. bogey

    noun Chiefly British Slang A piece of dried or semisolid nasal mucus; a booger. transitive verb To play (a hole in golf) scoring one stroke over par. from The Century Dictionary. noun See bogie. noun See bogy, bogyism. from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English. noun A goblin; a bugbear.

  23. Bogey Definition & Meaning

    Bogey definition, undefined See more. Games; Featured; Pop culture; Writing tips; Games. Daily Crossword ... Top Definitions Examples British. bogey 1 [ boh-gee; for 2 also b oo g-ee, boo-gee ] show ipa. ... to make a bogey on (a hole): Arnold Palmer bogeyed the 18th hole.