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How to Kill a Process in Windows 10

Soon it will be sleeping with the fishes

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Whether you’re dealing with a slow computer or just noticed a bunch of bloatware hogging all resources, killing the offending processes in Windows is the best method to deal with the problem.

Not only does this boost the performance of your PC, but it can also help stave off spyware and viruses. And before you ask: no, it’s not hard to kill a process in Windows 10. We’ll go over all the different ways you can do this safely and easily.

How to Kill a Process in Windows 10 image 1

Why Kill a Process in Windows 10?

Each running application in Windows is composed of one or more “processes.” These processes are responsible for writing things to memory, reacting to user input, and performing all the actual work behind a computer program.

The thing is, not all processes are represented by an active window on your desktop. Windows system processes, for example, run quietly in the background without any explicit permission from the user.

How to Kill a Process in Windows 10 image 2

And this is where the problem arises. Many unwanted applications like viruses or bloatware also run as hidden processes in the background, consuming resources and slowing down your computer. You can safely shut down even some Windows processes without impacting your computer.

Killing Unnecessary Processes With the Task Manager

The Windows Task Manager is the default tool for managing programs and processes on your computer. You can use it to view, analyze, or even terminate running applications and processes.

Its only drawback is its limited permissions. The Task Manager cannot kill protected processes (including system tasks and some viruses). In addition, it can be tedious to manually select and terminate all the target processes each time you run your computer.

  • To open the Task Manager, press Ctrl + Alt + Delete on your keyboard. Another way is to right-click anywhere on the Taskbar and select it from the menu that opens up.

How to Kill a Process in Windows 10 image 3

  • By default, Task Manager opens in a streamlined view that displays only the names of the running apps themselves. Select More details to see all the processes.

How to Kill a Process in Windows 10 image 4

  • Now you can see all the tasks running on your computer. They are split into the visible Apps and the invisible Background processes. You can see the CPU, Memory, Disk, and Network usage of each process on the right. Select any of the categories to sort the processes by resource usage.

How to Kill a Process in Windows 10 image 5

  • Look for the processes unrelated to any running app or useful services, and select them.

How to Kill a Process in Windows 10 image 6

  • You can also switch to the Details tab to get a more detailed overview of the processes. By looking at the User name, you can quickly identify which processes belong to the system.

How to Kill a Process in Windows 10 image 7

  • In either of these tabs, select the End task button at the bottom right to kill the process. The task will be terminated and disappear from the list.

How to Kill a Process in Windows 10 image 8

Using Command Prompt to Kill a Process in Windows

If you prefer command-line tools, then you can kill a process using CMD too. The Command Prompt gives access to many useful utilities , including one called Taskkill.

As the name suggests, you can use Taskkill to kill any running task or process. If you run CMD as an administrator, you can even kill protected tasks.

  • To use Taskkill, first open the Command Prompt. Type cmd in the search box and click on Run as administrator in the right-hand pane.

How to Kill a Process in Windows 10 image 9

  • Before you can use Taskkill, you need to know either the name or PID of the task in question. Enter tasklist to get a list of all the running processes on your computer.

How to Kill a Process in Windows 10 image 10

  • Now, you can use the Taskkill command in two ways. To use the PID, type taskkill /F /PID x , where x is the PID of the process you want to kill. You’ll be notified if the operation is successful.

How to Kill a Process in Windows 10 image 11

  • If you want to enter the name instead, use taskkill /IM “x” /F , where x is the name of the process in question.

How to Kill a Process in Windows 10 image 12

It may seem counter-intuitive to use a command-line tool when the Task Manager can do the same without any need for typed commands. This is because we have only touched upon the most basic way to use Taskkill. There are many other ways to filter the processes without having to look through them manually.

CMD is not the only method to kill Windows processes with typed commands. Powershell is Windows’ built-in scripting language that offers many similar capabilities. In a way, Powershell is just a more verbose form of the Command Prompt.

The power of Powershell comes from its ability to create scripts of commands, which Windows can execute at leisure. This allows you to automate complex tasks on Windows.

  • First, let us open PowerShell. Type PowerShell in the search bar and click on Run as administrator .

How to Kill a Process in Windows 10 image 13

  • The PowerShell window will open up. It looks remarkably similar to the Command Prompt, just with a different background color.

How to Kill a Process in Windows 10 image 14

  • Enter Get-Process to obtain a list of all the running processes on your computer.

How to Kill a Process in Windows 10 image 15

  • To end a process, you can use either the PID or the name. For example, type Stop-Process -ID x -Force , where x is the PID to end any process.

How to Kill a Process in Windows 10 image 16

  • Using the command does not produce any acknowledgment from the program, making it seem that nothing has happened. But that is its normal behavior for a successful operation. If you enter the wrong name, for example, you get an error message.

How to Kill a Process in Windows 10 image 17

  • Use the command Stop-Process -Name “x” -Force , where x is the name of the process, to kill the process. This time, the command is successful.

How to Kill a Process in Windows 10 image 18

If PowerShell seems underwhelming to you, it’s because we are using it like cmd. PowerShell is meant to create autonomous scripts that perform complex tasks independently, without any real-time feedback or input. While you can use it this way, the Command Prompt is frankly better at it.

Using KillProcess

So far, we have looked at tools and utilities present in your computer by default. While these certainly can get the job done, they lack some useful features present in third-party tools.

KillProcess is one such advanced task managing program. In addition to its ability to kill protected system processes, it also allows for creating a “Kill List”. Processes added to this list are automatically killed as soon as they enter active memory. This can be a great method to permanently shut down pesky bloatware.

  • To begin, download KillProcess from the official website . There is both an installer and a portable version that you can use without any installation.

How to Kill a Process in Windows 10 image 19

  • Upon running the app, you will be greeted with a task manager-like window. All the running processes on your computer are displayed in a list, along with their descriptions and memory usage.

How to Kill a Process in Windows 10 image 20

  • Right-click on the process you want to kill, and select Add to List.

How to Kill a Process in Windows 10 image 21

  • Processes added to the kill list show up with a green tick icon. To kill the processes of the list, click on the dynamite button on the bottom left.

How to Kill a Process in Windows 10 image 22

The best thing about this approach is that you don’t have to kill each process one by one. This Kill List remains saved even after you exit the program, so you only need to run KillProcess itself to terminate all unwanted processes at once.

Many Ways to Kill a Process in Windows 10

There are multiple ways to kill a process in Windows 10. The most straightforward method is to use the Task Manager. It allows you to view and terminate processes in an easy-to-understand GUI format.

In case the Task Manager cannot kill the process, you need to use something more powerful. You can either try a third-party tool like KillProcess or use command-line tools to kill the protected process.

To permanently shut down unnecessary background processes, prevent them from starting up automatically , or add them to KillProcess’ kill list.

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Levin Roy is a software engineer who loves writing about technology. Whether it is Windows tips-and-tricks or in-depth guides about application development, Levin uses his practical experience and technical skills to create articles that can help solve tricky problems. Read Levin's Full Bio

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It's FOSS

How to Find and Kill Zombie Process in Linux

Marco Carmona

Brief: This is a quick tip on finding zombie processes in Linux and then killing them. You also learn a thing or two about processes and zombie processes.

Before you learn about Zombie process, let me recall what is a process in Linux.

In a few words, a process is a running instance of a program in performance. It can be foreground (interactive process) or background (not interactive or automatic process). It can be a parent (creator of other processes during run-time) or child (process created by others) process.

In Linux, except for the first init (or systemd) process with PID 0, every other process has a parent process. Processes also have their own child processes.

Don’t believe me? Use the pstree command in terminal to look at the process tree to see the ‘family tree’ of your system’s processes.

What is a Zombie process in Linux?

When a child process dies, the parent process is informed so that it can do some clean up like freeing up memory etc. However, child process goes into zombie state if the parent process is not aware of its death. For the parent, the child still exists but the child process is actually dead. This is how zombie processes (also known as defunct processes) are created and stay in the system.

Here’s an excellent funny take on the zombie process by Turnoff.us:

zombies turnoff

Do you really need to worry about Zombie processes?

Here is important to say that zombie processes are not as dangerous as its name can sound.

The problem may arise if your system has limited RAM or if there are too many zombie processes eating up RAM. Also, most Linux processes can have maximum PID set to 32768. If there are no available IDs for other productive tasks, your system may crash.

This rarely happens, but it’s a possibility, specially if a poorly coded program starts inducing numerous zombie processes.

In such case, it would be a good idea to find and kill zombie process.

How to find zombie processes?

A process in Linux can have one of the following states:

  • D = uninterruptible sleep
  • R = running
  • S = sleeping
  • T = stopped by job control signal
  • t = stopped by debugger during trace

But where can you see the processes and their respective status? One easy way is to use the terminal and the top command .

top command view

As you can see in the screenshot above, there are 250 total tasks (or processes), 1 is running, 248 processes are sleeping and 1 is in zombie state.

Now, the question arises, how to kill the zombie process?

How to find and kill a zombie process? Can a zombie process be killed?

kill zombie process linux

A zombie process is already dead. How do you kill an already dead process?

In the zombie movies, you shoot the zombies in the head or burn it. That’s not an option here. You can burn your system for killing the zombie process but that’s not a feasible solution ;)

Some people suggests sending SIGCHLD signal to the parent process. But it is more likely to be ignored. The other option to kill the zombie process is to kill its parent process. That sounds brutal but that’s the only sure shot way of killing zombie processes.

So, first, let’s list the zombie processes to know their ID. It can be achieved by using the ps command like this in the terminal.

The 8th column in the output of the ps aux command displays the state of a process. You are asking to print all the matching lines where the state of a process starts with Z or z.

Once you have identified its process ID, let’s get its parent’s process ID.

Alternatively, you can combine the above two commands in the following fashion where it directly provides the PID of the zombie process and the PID of its parent process.

Here you get the parent process ID, so finally kill the process by typing the command line with its respective ID process obtained before.

killing parent process

You can verify if the zombie process is killed or not by running the ps command again or even the top command.

Congrats! Now you know how to eliminate zombie processes.

With inputs from Abhishek Prakash.

Marco Carmona

My name is Marco Antonio Carmona, I'm a physics and data science student, a great and passionate reader, and randomly, my favorite hobby is writing about what I learn day by day.

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How-To Geek

How to kill processes from the linux terminal.

Need to kill a wayward process from your Linux or macOS command line? We'll show you how.

Quick Links

What is a process, what does killing a process do, the kill command, the pkill command, the killall command, can you kill any process, key takeaways.

  • Killing a process simply means forcing it to quit, and it can be necessary when a process is unresponsive or misbehaving.
  • Linux and macOS have commands like kill, pkill, and killall that allow you to terminate processes by either their PID or name.
  • It's important to be cautious when killing processes and ensure that you are terminating the correct one to avoid any unintended consequences.

Killing a process is sometimes the only way to get rid of it. Despite the harsh name, "killing" a process just means "forcing it to quit." Here's how to do it from the Linux or macOS command line.

Running programs like your web browser, background processes associated with your desktop environment, and Linux system services are all processes.

You can lump processes into two groups:

  • Foreground processes are ones that have been started or launched by a user. They may be in a terminal window, or they may be a graphical application.
  • Background processes are all of the processes that are started automatically and don't have any interaction with users. They don't expect input from users nor do they present results or output to them. Background processes are things like services and daemons.

If the foreground processes are the front of theater staff and the actors, the background processes are the backstage "behind the scenes" team.

When processes misbehave or malfunction, they can hog too much CPU time, consume your RAM, or enter a tight computational loop and become unresponsive. Graphical applications can refuse to respond to mouse clicks. Terminal applications might never return you to the command prompt.

"Killing" a process just means "forcing the process to quit." This may be necessary if the process is refusing to respond.

Linux provides the kill , pkill , and killall commands to allow you to do just that. These commands can be used with any type of process, graphical or command line, foreground or background.

To use kill , you must know the process ID (PID) of the process you wish to terminate. The ps command can be used to find the PID of a process.

To have ps search through all of the processes use the -e (all processes) option. Piping the output through less is advisable, there's going to be quite a bit of it. Type ps , a space, -e , a space, | (a pipe character), another space and then type less . Press Enter to execute the command.

ps -e | less

This will give you a process listing that looks similar to the below screenshot. You can search forward in less using the / key and you can search backward using the ? key.

To home in on the process you're interested in, pipe the output from ps through grep and specify the name — or part of the name — of the process.

ps -e | grep shutter

Once you have located the PID of the process you wish to terminate, pass it to the kill command as a parameter. To terminate the shutter process identified by the previous command, use this command:

The kill command is a silent assassin — it does not give you any feedback if it was successful.

It also works just the same for killing processes on macOS .

The pkill command allows you to kill a process — or processes — by name. You do not need to identify the process by PID. To use pkill you provide a search term that pkill uses to check against the list of running processes. Matching processes are terminated. So you need to be positive you've got that search term spelled correctly.

As a safety net, you can use the pgrep command before you use the pkill command. The pgrep command also accepts a search term. It will list the PID of each process that matches the search term. This is safe because pgrep will not issue any kill signal to the processes, and if you mistype the search term you will not kill another process by mistake. You can make sure you have the search term correctly thought out before you pass it to pkill . Both pkill and pgrep treat the search term in the same way. Their treatment is so similar that they share the same man page .

Let's suppose there is a process with "subq" in its name. We'll use the ps -u dave | grep command to get a peek behind the curtain. You can see that "subq" will match that process and that process alone. That was just so you can see the full name of the process.

ps -u dave | grep subq

Let's assume our user hasn't done that; all they know is the process name contains the substring "subq." They use pgrep to check that there is only one match to the search term. They then use that search term with pkill .

You can use pkill to kill several processes at once. Here the user runs pgrep to check how many processes Chrome has launched. They use pkill to kill them all. They then check with pgrep that they have all been removed.

pgrep chrome

pkill chrome

If several processes with the same name are running, but you do not want to kill them all, you can use pgrep with the -f (command line) option to identify which process is which. A simple example would be two ping processes. You want to kill one of them but not the other. You can use their command lines to distinguish between them. Note the use of quotation marks to wrap the command line parameter.

pgrep -f "ping 192.168.4.22"

pkill -f "ping 192.168.4.22"

Warning : In the Solaris and OpenIndiana operating systems the killall command will kill all the processes that belong to you. If are root or if you have issued sudo killall you will reboot your computer! During the research for this article, this behavior was confirmed with the latest version of OpenIndiana Hipster 2018.10.

The killall command operates in a similar way to the pkill command but with a specific difference. Instead of passing a search term to the command you must provide the exact process name.

You cannot provide a partial match to a process name; you must provide the entire process name, as shown:

killall shutt

killall shutter

The -y (younger than) option allows you to kill processes that have been running for less than a specified period. The period is given in numbers followed by one of these units:

  • s (seconds)
  • m (minutes)
  • M (months, note, capital "M")

To kill a process called ana that has just been launched and leave any older instances of ana running, you could use the following parameters with killall , if you'd reacted within two minutes:

killall -y 2m ana

The -o (older than) option allows you to kill processes that have been running for longer than a specified period. This command will kill all ssh connections that have been running for longer than a day:

killall -o 1d sshd

These commands will allow you to identify and terminate errant processes with accuracy and safety correctly. However, you can be too trigger happy, and it is entirely possible to terminate a process that you shouldn't.

Always be cautious. First, make sure the process you're about to kill is really the one you want. Second, double check — be careful and ensure the targeted process is the one you want to end. Proceed with terminating the process once you're satisfied.

If you do terminate a process accidentally, isn't the end of the world. The most likely outcome is something gets buggy and you have to restart your PC, or you may lose work you've done in the program associated with the process you terminated.

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How do I kill a runaway console process under WSL?

I made the mistake of running the command:

cat /dev/urandom

And the console (hosted on Windows) filled with junk and stopped responding to Ctrl - Z or anything else.

Is there any way I could have recovered the console from this?

  • command-line
  • windows-subsystem-for-linux

Tejas Lotlikar's user avatar

  • Can't you just close WSL and reopen it? That should kill it, considering you can't run a FTP server or any type of server in WSL and close the window as it will kill any running app. Normally it is Ctrl+C to break a command. –  Terrance Dec 28, 2020 at 4:57
  • 1 Alternatively open another WSL sesstion, ps -ef | egrep cat and then kill -9 the processid of the cat process. –  cup Dec 30, 2020 at 15:47
  • Just ran into the same situation. Window does not respond, task manager does not end the task, kill -9 does nothing. I guess nothing but reboot will help. –  comodoro Jan 21, 2022 at 19:05

First of all I want to highlight there is a significant difference between ctrl + z and ctrl + c :

  • ctrl + z sends SIGTSTP to a foreground process, effectively putting it in the background - it is not appropriate in this case.
  • ctrl + c sends SIGINT which will interrupt the process and this is what you should try first.

More about the signals you can read at man 7 signal .

Sometimes just closing the terminal window is not the best solution because you will lost the recent history which could be important for you.

By opening another terminal window (or TTY at real Linux) you can try to kill the cat process by either of the following commands.

The command killall kills processes by name and it will try to kill all cat processes. The option -s 9 will send SIGKILL instead SIGTERM which could be read as force kill . In most cases just killall cat is enough.

The command kill will send a signal to a process and by the option -9 we will send SIGKILL as in the above command, but here we must provide PIDs (process identifiers) instead of names. The command substitution $() will provide a list of all cat processes running on the system. Here is haw:

  • ps -e will list all running processes on the system,
  • this list will be piped | as input to the awk command,
  • finally awk '/cat/ {print $1}' will filter the list by printing the first field $1 of each line that contains the string cat . This first field contains the PID of the relevant process.

Note in both commands you do not need to use sudo because normally your user should be the owner of the cat process(es).

pa4080's user avatar

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kill a ghost process

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How do I prevent orphaned `sshd` processes on the server end?

I have a number of processes on client machines that ssh to server machines and do things. Sometimes those client processes end unexpectedly for whatever reason. This always leaves an sshd process running on the server end. I want that process to die.

Note that this is different than disconnecting an idle process. An idle process is one where no user data is flowing. An unused terminal window running ssh, for instance, is idle but not disconnected. This is not a case I want to kill--I want merely idle connections to stay alive.

A disconnected process is one where the client end no longer has the socket open.

The server end could theoretically detect this by ssh / sshd jointly using heartbeats in a side band. If either one fails to hear the other's heartbeats, it could kill itself. But I can't find an option that does that. (There are many options that sound like they do that, but don't.)

Obviously it is also possible to periodically "reap" the orphaned sshd s on the server end. I'd want to avoid that too. For any reap period, I could have many orphaned connections (in a parallel processing situation, for instance). Also, I would have to through some gyrations to prevent myself from killing in-use sshd instances, if there's even a way for me to detect that.

How can I make sshd detect disconnected clients and kill itself?

drysdam's user avatar

  • There is a distinction between "client socket is closed" (in which case the client OS will send a TCP RST as soon as the server tries to send any data) and "client is gone" (in which case the server will reach a TCP retransmission timeout several minutes after trying to send any data). –  u1686_grawity Dec 1, 2021 at 16:27
  • OK. Either version of "the socket is not open" could happen and I'd like the server end to kill the sshd process in either case. Granted that it may take a few minutes for the server to realize this in some cases. –  drysdam Dec 1, 2021 at 16:37

The man page for sshd_config will tell you that setting ClientAliveCountMax & ClientAliveInterval should do as you wish.

ClientAliveCountMax is defaulted to 3, meaning you just need to set ClientAliveInterval to a suitable size.

Bib's user avatar

  • +1. True. The issue in the question is exactly what ClientAlive* are for. Sometimes people misinterpret these settings . –  Kamil Maciorowski Dec 1, 2021 at 15:58
  • This question and answer is pretty clear that this are about idleness not disconnectivity . And in practice, this doesn't seem to work. One of my servers has ClientAliveInterval 300 and ClientAliveCountMax 3 and keeps disconnected instances around for weeks at a time. –  drysdam Dec 1, 2021 at 16:30
  • More googling indicates that you are right, this is how that's supposed to work. I guess I now need to figure out why it isn't on any machine I touch.... –  drysdam Dec 1, 2021 at 16:42
  • After some experiments, I got this working...but the logic for CountMax seems to be reversed. The server only terminates a missing client if ClientAliveCountMax is set to 0. If I set the Interval to 300 and the CountMax to 3, nothing happens after 15 minutes. If I set CountMax to 0, the server correctly terminates after 5 minutes. –  drysdam Dec 1, 2021 at 18:23

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kill a ghost process

Killing processes

A process is a unit of execution carried out by Adaptive Server. Each process is assigned a unique process identification number when it starts. This number is called a spid . These numbers are stored, along with other information about each process, in master..sysprocesses . Processes running in a parallel-processes environment create child processes, each of which has its own spid s. Several processes create and assign spids : starting Adaptive Server, login tasks, checkpoints, the housekeeper tasks, and so on. You can see most of the information by running sp_who .

Running sp_who on a single-engine server shows the sp_who process running and all other processes that are “runnable” or in one of the sleep states. In multi-engine servers, there can be a process running for each engine.

The kill command gets rid of an ongoing process. The most frequent reason for killing a process is that it interferes with other users, and the person responsible for running it is not available. The process may hold locks that block access to database objects, or there may be many sleeping processes occupying the available user connections. A system administrator can kill most running or "runnable" processes, including those that are waiting for:

An alarm, such as a waitfor command

Network sends or receives

Synchronization messages from another process in a family

Adaptive Server allows you to kill processes only if it can cleanly roll back any uncompleted transactions and release all system resources that are used by the process. For processes that are part of a family, killing any of the child processes also kills all other processes in the family. However, it is easiest to kill the parent process. For a family of processes, the kill command is detected more quickly if the status of the child processes is sync sleep .

Table 12-2 shows the status values that sp_who reports and when the kill command takes effect.

Only system administrators can issue the kill command; permission to use it cannot be transferred.

The syntax is:

You can kill only one process at a time, but you can perform a series of kill commands in a batch. For example:

A kill command is irreversible and cannot be included in a user-defined transaction. spid must be a numeric constant; you cannot use a variable. Here is some sample output from sp_who :

In the example above, processes 2–6 cannot be killed: they are system processes. The login name NULL and the lack of a host name identify processes them as system processes. NETWORK HANDLER, MIRROR HANDLER, HOUSEKEEPER, and CHECKPOINT SLEEP (or, rarely, CHECKPOINT) always appear in sp_who output. AUDIT PROCESS appears if auditing is available.

Processes 1, 8, 9, and 10 can be killed, since they have the status values “recv sleep,” “send sleep,” “alarm sleep,” and “lock sleep.”

In sp_who output, you cannot tell whether a is “recv sleep” belongs to a user who is using Adaptive Server and may be pausing to examine the results of a command, or whether a user has restarted a PC or other terminal, and left a stranded process. Query the sysprocesses table to learn more about questionable processes. For example, this query shows the host process ID and client software used by process 8:

This query, plus the information about the user and host from the sp_who results, provides additional information for tracking down the process from the operating system level.

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Woman Wakes Up To Gunfire in Her Bedroom and Dead Husband in Kitchen in New Dateline

Dateline correspondent Andrea Canning described the chilling tale to NBC Insider as "truly one of the most outrageous cases" she's ever encountered.

Corey Shaughnessy during interviews on Dateline "Ghosts Cant Talk"

Shots in the night unraveled a Texas murder-for-hire plot reminiscent of a Hollywood movie script. 

How to Watch

Watch Dateline on NBC and Peacock . 

The shocking story of survival — and death — will play out in an all-new Dateline NBC Friday, January 12 at 9/8c, chillingly titled “Ghosts Can’t Talk.” 

As the official synopsis explains: “When Corey Shaughnessy wakes up to gunfire in the middle of the night, she shoots at the intruder and miraculously survives, only to discover that her husband Ted has been killed. Detectives wonder if the couple’s job as local jewelry shop owners could be a possible motive until the investigation takes a turn that no one saw coming.”

RELATED: Neighbor Is Arrested After 4-Year-Old Girl Is Found Dead in a Box — But Did He Do It?

After years chasing down the story, correspondent Andrea Canning sat down with Corey as she shared her harrowing ordeal.

“It was like a movie script, only it was real life,” Canning told NBC Insider . “My heart broke for her. It’s truly one of the most outrageous cases I’ve covered.” 

What happened to Corey and Ted Shaughnessy?

As Corey explains in  a terrifying preview clip  for the new Dateline episode, she had been asleep in her bed when she woke up to gunfire and grabbed the .357 she always kept above her bed and opened fire on her unknown assailant. “I do not remember the sound of my gun,” she said. “I remember seeing the muzzle from the opposite gun. He’s shooting at me and I’m shooting at him.” 

After running out of ammo and believing she was moments away from death, Corey somehow made her way to the kitchen where she found Ted, her husband of 30 years, dead on the floor.  “Oh God,” an agonized Corey screamed to a 911 dispatcher. 

The dispatcher assured her police were on the way and instructed her to open the front door after confirming there were “units on the scene.” 

“There’s no one here,” a stunned Corey said in the final moments of the preview video.

RELATED:  Beloved School Administrator Found Dead During Scuba Trip, But Was It an Accident or Murder?

Canning adds in the clip: “No police. Just silence and the beginning of a mystery where nothing would be where it seemed."

The Dateline correspondent told NBC Insider that Corey has a powerful message everyone should hear. 

“The woman, the widow at the center of this, Corey Shaughnessy, said one thing that everyone needs to realize is that your whole life can change in a second. Don’t take anything for granted.”

After spending years working to track down interviews in the case, even Canning found herself surprised by the twists and turns the case would take.

Nicolas Shaughnessy during interviews on Dateline "Ghosts Cant Talk"

RELATED: Idaho Woman's Affair with Her Married Boss Leads To Deadly Consequences

“The most surprising thing in all this is that you can give someone everything; your love, your time, your money... and the ultimate betrayal can still happen,” Canning told NBC Insider . 

The upcoming episode will also include interviews with Nicolas Shaughnessy, the son of Corey and Ted, along with Travis County Sheriff’s investigators James Moore and Paul Salo, Defense Attorney Rick Flores, family friends Tad Cole and Vicki Frenk, and more. 

“It was not an easy story to put together and there were times I thought it would never air, but very satisfying when so many of those involved trusted us with their story in the end,” Canning said.

To see the dramatic story unfold, tune in to “Ghosts Can’t Talk” on Dateline NBC Friday, January 12 at 9/8c on NBC, or stream it the following day on Peacock .

And for more Dateline, sign up for their official newsletter and check out their podcast .

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Dateline on NBC and Peacock

Capcom rolls back Resident Evil Revelations update that caused performance problems and crashes as fans accuse it of trying to sneak in DRM in order to kill mod support

The Enigma Protector DRM has reportedly been added to a number of older Capcom games.

Resident Evil Revelations screenshot

Capcom is facing accusations from fans that it's quietly adding new DRM to its older games on PC, in what appears to be an attempt to crack down on the use of mods. But the process went from "quiet" to "very noisy" after a recent update to Resident Evil Revelations caused slowdown and crashes , and prevented some mods from working. Shortly after the update went live Capcom rolled it back, but said it will be re-released once the problem is resolved.

The Resident Evil Revelations update went live on January 8, and users quickly began reporting a range of problems in its wake. That sparked a nasty backlash in the form of—you guessed it—more than 200 negative user reviews over the past few days. 

We reached out to Capcom for more information about the update and have not received a reply, but the makers of Enigma Protector, the DRM that Capcom's apparently been adding to its games, did respond to a player's inquiry about the DRM, and its dismissive tone did not make players happy. 

"Why are you so sure that all that you reported belongs to our software?" an Enigma representative responded on the message board for its software, before suggesting that people were angry "because you can't use the cheats anymore." (The original post has since been deleted but remains available via an Archive link.)

Resident Evil Revelations isn't the only older Capcom game that's been updated with the Enigma DRM: As noted by Eurogamer , Mega Man Battle Network Legacy Collection and Ghost Trick: Phantom Detective both received similar updates in late 2023. According to Steam user Waifu4Life , other Capcom games with Enigma Protector DRM installed include Capcom Arcade Stadium and Arcade 2nd Stadium, Mega Man Zero/ZX Legacy Collection, Resident Evil 5, Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection, and Strider. 

Those games didn't see the same kind of pushback from players as Resident Evil Revelations, presumably because the relevant updates didn't so immediately and obviously break things, although negative user reviews are now starting to appear on some of their Steam pages.

Capcom hasn't said what the Resident Evil Revelations update was intended to do, or what went wrong, but it did at least acknowledge that it wasn't working like it was meant to. "Due to an issue observed with the latest update released, we have reverted the corresponding update," Capcom wrote on Steam following the rollback. "We apologize for the inconvenience caused, and once the issue is resolved, we will re-release the update. Thank you very much for your patience and cooperation."

"Patience" from players doesn't actually seem to be in great supply at the moment, and not just because of the problems with Revelations. It's not clear why Capcom would start applying new DRM to older games (Resident Evil Revelations came out in 2013) but a widely-held assumption is that it's an effort to crack down on the use of mods. Capcom spoke out forcefully against the use of mods in its games in November 2023, shortly after organizers of a Street Fighter 6 tournament forgot to switch off a nude mod and broadcast naked Chun Li to the world.

There was no direct link made to that incident in Capcom's reaction, but the publisher was clear about where it stands on the matter. In an October 2023 presentation on anti-cheat and anti-piracy measures, it described mods as "another problem" inherent in gaming on PC, and said that "all mods are defined as cheats, except when they are officially supported." That presentation came only days before Capcom patched Enigma into Mega Man Battle Network Legacy Collection.

"The majority of mods can have a positive impact on the game. Some mods, however, can be detrimental to the company both in terms of reputational damage and in terms of workload," Capcom said. "There are a number of mods that are offensive to public order and morals. When these are disseminated, the image of the product is tarnished and branding is affected. Also, these offensive mods may be mistaken for legitimate implementations, and can cause reputational damage.

"Anti-cheat and anti-piracy measures are very important to protect the company's future profits and reputation ... As long as you publish PC games, you must take countermeasures. Otherwise, financial damages, reputational damage, and workload will accumulate."

Capcom is correct that mods are a major part of what makes PC gaming so great—what it may have misjudged is how players will react when you try to take that away. Assuming that's what's happening here, it's not the first time Capcom has taken aggressive action in order to discourage mods: In December 2023, Monster Hunter YouTube channel Team Darkside said Capcom Japan's legal team was issuing takedown requests and copyright strikes against Monster Hunter Rise: Sunbreak videos featuring any kind of mod usage.

So far Capcom hasn't made any public comment about the Resident Evil Revelations update, or its apparent anti-mod efforts in general, nor has it responded to inquiries. In a statement sent to PC Gamer, an Enigma Protector representative essentially disavowed involvement, and said that people unhappy with the situation should direct their inquiries (and anger) at Capcom.

"We produce a software for protection of Windows executable files against reverse engineering, cracking and so on," the rep said. "Our customers protect their own software with ours. Note, we do not control what software is being protected, we do not control how it is protected, we do not know protection options that are used. We do not even have contacts with our customers regarding protection ... Usage of our product fully belongs to the customer. We can't even know what software is protected and why it is protected."

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Andy Chalk

Andy has been gaming on PCs from the very beginning, starting as a youngster with text adventures and primitive action games on a cassette-based TRS80. From there he graduated to the glory days of Sierra Online adventures and Microprose sims, ran a local BBS, learned how to build PCs, and developed a longstanding love of RPGs, immersive sims, and shooters. He began writing videogame news in 2007 for The Escapist and somehow managed to avoid getting fired until 2014, when he joined the storied ranks of PC Gamer. He covers all aspects of the industry, from new game announcements and patch notes to legal disputes, Twitch beefs, esports, and Henry Cavill. Lots of Henry Cavill.

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Vanderbilt football hires former New Mexico State coach Jerry Kill in off-field role

kill a ghost process

Vanderbilt football has hired Jerry Kill, the former coach at New Mexico State, Minnesota and Northern Illinois, as chief consultant to the head coach and senior offensive advisor.

The program announced the hire Jan. 17.

Kill worked with new offensive coordinator Tim Beck at New Mexico State before retiring at the end of the 2023 season. As an off-field staffer, he would not be able to recruit.

The Commodores have brought in several New Mexico State staffers this offseason under Clark Lea. In addition to Beck, Vanderbilt also hired the Aggies' former co-defensive coordinator Melvin Rice as safeties coach and Garrett Altman as an offensive analyst after he served in the same role with New Mexico State. The Commodores also took the Aggies' former backup quarterback, Blaze Berlowitz, as a transfer .

Under Kill, the Aggies finished 10-5 and played in the Conference USA championship game in 2023. In Kill's two years, he led New Mexico State to back-to-back bowl bids for the first time since 1959-60.

“I’m excited to welcome Coach Kill to Vanderbilt,” Lea said in a release. “He is a proven builder of strong, winning cultures. His leadership and experience will be tremendous assets as we build Vanderbilt football into the dominant program we all expect it to be."

TRANSFER TRACKER Vanderbilt football transfer portal tracker 2023: Who is joining, leaving the Commodores

Aria Gerson covers Vanderbilt athletics for The Tennessean. Contact her at  [email protected]  or on Twitter  @aria_gerson .

NJ.com

N.J. cracking down on toll cheats, including ‘ghost tag’ users

Gov. Phil Murphy has signed two new laws designed to cut down on toll cheats.

One sets up uniform enforcement and an appeals process for repeat offenders and another tightens security of temporary tags and stiffens penalties for fakes sold by dealers. Both laws were signed by the governor on Tuesday evening.

The toll bill allows the New Jersey Department of Transportation to work with the state Motor Vehicle Commission to suspend the vehicle registrations of chronic violator. Passed 33-0 by the state Senate last week, part of the law’s goal is to stem the loss of revenue caused by repeat offenders, which cost New Jersey toll authorities $117 million in 2022 .

“I am thankful to see Governor Murphy sign this bill into law,” said Assemblyman William F. Moen Jr. D-Camden, a sponsor of the assembly bill. “I know what positive impact this will have for our tolling agencies. It allows our tolling agencies to have greater support from the NJDOT adding another tool in their toolbox, to increase efficiency while embracing new technology.”

The law applies to drivers with $500 or more in unpaid tolls and fees and offers an amnesty period with a 25% reduction off the $500 or more owed if all outstanding tolls are paid in full. That one time program will run for 180 days from the effective date of the law.

Before the new law was passed, only the Turnpike Authority had the ability to ask the Motor Vehicle Commission to suspend a driver’s vehicle registration privilege.

The law also allow the state DOT to negotiate reciprocity agreements with other state toll agencies to suspend the registrations of out-of-state toll violators. “A more tangible benefit is that the law provides an avenue for those agencies to pursue in-state and out-of-state toll violators, which cost the state $117 million in 2022 ,” Moen said.

The law establishes an appeal process for drivers who believe a toll violation is incorrect. This process would not require a person to appear in person to make an appeal. “The law also provides a path for an owner of the motor vehicle to address or appeal any unjustified violations, which is an important function,” Moen said.

Losses from unpaid tolls totaled $56.2 million for the New Jersey Turnpike and Garden State Parkway combined, and $36.58 million at the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, according to the agencies. The bi-state Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission reported a loss of $20 million in unpaid tolls in 2022. Its eight toll bridges support 12 toll-free bridges.

The Delaware River Port Authority which has gone 13 years without raising tolls lost $3 million in 2022.

“DRPA is glad to have the additional tools provided by the legislation to collect unpaid tolls,” said Mike Williams, a spokesperson. “The ability to collect unpaid tolls will help to offset some of the persistent revenue losses the DRPA has faced since the pandemic.”

The National Motorist Association asked Murphy to veto the bill because amendments removed “due process” language that would have provided an administrative hearing and an appeal to the Office of Administrative Law, which it argued is a more formalized process and provides an appeal to a higher authority.

“What NJDOT will do is narrower than E-ZPass customer service or the NY state office of the toll payer advocate ,” said Steve Carrella, the association’s state policy director. “NJDOT will just deal with unpaid tolls when the threshold is reached. The mindset will be guilty until the motorist can prove their innocence, given the reason for creating this adjudicate and enforce process in NJDOT.”

“The answer could be in how the law is implemented, he said. A quick administrative order is an option but only lasts 18 months,” Carrellas said. “To continue, the standard administrative rule-making process has to be followed which includes public comment.”

The rule-making process will offer an opportunity to fix problems in the first 18 months, he said.

A second law signed by Murphy tightens up regulations on temporary license plates or paper tags issued by car dealers. The law increase fines for dealers that sell fraudulent “ghost tags” and drivers that use them to evade tolls and drive unregistered vehicles.

MTA CEO Janno Lieber held up a fake New Jersey Temporary tag at a May 2022 press conference. announcing an MTA crackdown on fake and obscured license plates used by toll cheats.

In 2023, the MTA and police impounded 143 vehicles owing $3.2 million in tolls and fines during multiple enforcement blitzes at the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge, where many impounded vehicles had paper tags from New Jersey.

During May 2023 transportation budget hearings, lawmakers questioned state Motor Vehicle Commission officials after a Streetsblog investigation revealed that paper tags could be bought from some New Jersey dealers online without purchasing a vehicle from them.

That led state Senate Majority Leader M. Teresa Ruiz, D-Essex, and state Sen. Nilsa I. Cruz-Perez, D-Camden, to introduce the legislation that Murphy signed Tuesday.

The new law cracks down on both dealers who sell these tags and those who buy them by making the transactions a fourth-degree crime and possession of a fake tag a disorderly persons offense.

Dealers who violate the law face increased penalties of $2,500 for a first offense and $5,000 for subsequent offenses. Each temporary license plate issued that violates the law is considered a separate offense. Fourth degree crimes carry penalties of up to 18 months in jail, up to a $10,000 fine, or both.

The Motor Vehicle Commission also can suspend or revoke the license of a dealer who commits multiple violations or is convicted of violating the new law, after a hearing.

Drivers who buy, possess, or use fake temporary tags face up to six months imprisonment, up to a $1,000 fine or both if charged as a disorderly person. Drivers charged as a petty disorderly person face up to 30 days in jail, up to a $500 fine, or both under the new law.

“Those two bills together will put New Jersey on higher platform to address the ghost tag issue,” said Moen, who sponsored the Assembly version of the bill.

Thank you for relying on us to provide the journalism you can trust. Please consider supporting NJ.com with a subscription.

Larry Higgs may be reached at [email protected] . Follow him on X @CommutingLarry

©2024 Advance Local Media LLC. Visit nj.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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IMAGES

  1. How to kill a Ghost

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  2. How To Kill A Ghost

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  3. how to kill a ghost

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  4. DEAD FRIENDS

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  5. Unix & Linux: How to kill a ghost process? AIX 6.1?

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  6. how to kill a ghost simple tip ︎

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  2. You can kill a ghost? #ytshorts #youtubeshorts #gaming #retrogaming #shortvideo #shorts

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  4. Stealth kill

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  6. GHOST KILL BILL👑

COMMENTS

  1. How to Kill a Process in Windows 10

    To open the Task Manager, press Ctrl + Alt + Delete on your keyboard. Another way is to right-click anywhere on the Taskbar and select it from the menu that opens up. By default, Task Manager opens in a streamlined view that displays only the names of the running apps themselves. Select More details to see all the processes.

  2. Really killing a process in Windows

    3/ Once found, right click on its name then click on « properties ». 4/ In the properties interface, click on « security «. 5/ Click on « edit » to change permissions. 6/ « Deny » all permissions for all users, click on « apply » then « ok ». 7/ click on « advanced » for special permissions settings.

  3. How to Find and Kill Zombie Process in Linux

    Alternatively, you can combine the above two commands in the following fashion where it directly provides the PID of the zombie process and the PID of its parent process. ps -A -ostat,pid,ppid | grep -e ' [zZ]'. Here you get the parent process ID, so finally kill the process by typing the command line with its respective ID process obtained before.

  4. How to Kill Zombie Processes on Linux

    How to Kill Zombie Processes on Linux Home Linux How to Kill Zombie Processes on Linux By Dave McKay Published Nov 25, 2020 Linux zombies are inert--they don't run and bite. We explain why they happen, and how to dispatch them. Readers like you help support How-To Geek.

  5. How do I kill a process that is dead but listening?

    Since your process is listed as System, most likely you can kill it on a "System" command prompt. The System account has more privileges than a regular administrator. You can a get "System" cmd.exe by scheduling a task for cmd.exe (the scheduler runs as System): at 15:23 /interactive "cmd.exe".

  6. How to Kill Processes From the Linux Terminal

    The pkill Command The killall Command Can You Kill Any Process? Key Takeaways Killing a process simply means forcing it to quit, and it can be necessary when a process is unresponsive or misbehaving. Linux and macOS have commands like kill, pkill, and killall that allow you to terminate processes by either their PID or name.

  7. How to Kill a Process in Linux from Command Line?

    Introduction If a Linux process becomes unresponsive or consumes too many resources, you may need to kill it. Most processes have their own methods of shutting down. Unfortunately, processes can malfunction and require running a command to manually kill it. This guide will show you how to kill a Linux process using the command line. Prerequisites

  8. Killing zombie processes on Linux using kill command

    Use the top command or ps command along with grep command / egrep command: # top Try the following commands to find zombie processes as root user: # ps aux | awk ' { print $8 " " $2 }' | grep -w Z Here is what we see Z 4104 Z 5320 Z 2945 To get more human readable outputs try: # ps aux | egrep "Z|defunct" | grep -v 'grep'

  9. How to Clean a Linux Zombie Process

    Next, let's send the SIGCHLD signal to the parent process using the kill command: kill -s SIGCHLD 103. However, it isn't really guaranteed that sending the SIGCHLD signal to the parent will kill a zombie process . It works only in cases where parent processes can handle the SIGCHLD signals. 3.2.

  10. How to kill a ghost process? AIX 6.1

    1 Answer Sorted by: 1 Seems you caused the high CPU load by sending it a signal. It is a kernel process, and there's an APAR for this issue: http://www-01.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?uid=isg1IZ97168 Be advised that the Ifix requires a reboot, as the fix is for the kernel.

  11. How To Find And Kill Ghost Processes In Linux

    The only way to kill a zombie process is to kill its parent. In addition to using the ps command to find out what zombie processes are running, you can use the ps command to locate a process. We can use the kill command to kill zombie processes once the PID of the parent process is obtained.

  12. How do I kill a runaway console process under WSL?

    The option -s 9 will send SIGKILL instead SIGTERM which could be read as force kill. In most cases just killall cat is enough. kill -9 $ (ps -e | awk '/cat/ {print $1}') The command kill will send a signal to a process and by the option -9 we will send SIGKILL as in the above command, but here we must provide PIDs (process identifiers) instead ...

  13. HowTo: Use ps, kill, nice, and killall To Manage processes ...

    To kill process by name, use killall command. The basic syntax is as follows: $ killall process $ killall firefox $ killall -SIGNAL process $ killall -term firefox $ killall -15 command $ killall -15 firefox To kill user's process: $ killall -u <user> process $ killall -u tom firefox Depending upon your shell you might need different flags or ...

  14. How to kill all processes using a given GPU?

    This worked for me: kill $ (nvidia-smi -g 2 | awk '$5=="PID" {p=1} p {print $5}') where the -g sets the gpu id to kill processes in and $5 is the PID column. You can omit the -g argument if you want to kill processes in all the gpus. The awk-ification can by further enhanced by conditioning on the gpu memory usage: awk '$5=="PID" && $8>0 {p ...

  15. How do I prevent orphaned `sshd` processes on the server end?

    The server end could theoretically detect this by ssh / sshd jointly using heartbeats in a side band. If either one fails to hear the other's heartbeats, it could kill itself. But I can't find an option that does that. (There are many options that sound like they do that, but don't.) Obviously it is also possible to periodically "reap" the ...

  16. Unix & Linux: How to kill a ghost process? AIX 6.1?

    Unix & Linux: How to kill a ghost process? AIX 6.1?Helpful? Please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/roelvandepaarWith thanks & praise to God, ...

  17. python

    5 Those processes can probably be termed as ghost processes. Those are caused from the previous run when one does not detach the lldb from it. Manually searching for the process ID of those and killing them solved the problem. List python related processes ps -ef | grep python Killing the ones you identify as ghost. kill -9 <process-id> Share

  18. How to claim your slice of a $100 million Verizon settlement

    Eligible customers are receiving postcards or emails alerting them to file a claim by April 15 to receive up to $100, which is the result of the lawsuit accusing Verizon of charging fees that were ...

  19. Killing processes

    The syntax is: kill spid. You can kill only one process at a time, but you can perform a series of kill commands in a batch. For example: 1> kill 7 2> kill 8 3> kill 9 4> go. A kill command is irreversible and cannot be included in a user-defined transaction. spid must be a numeric constant; you cannot use a variable.

  20. What Happened To Corey Shaughnessy, Featured on Dateline

    What happened to Corey and Ted Shaughnessy? As Corey explains in a terrifying preview clip for the new Dateline episode, she had been asleep in her bed when she woke up to gunfire and grabbed the ...

  21. Cleanly kill all vim process from other tabs

    0. I use this one to find and kill the VIM process. ps axuw | grep vim | grep -v grep | awk ' {print $2}' | xargs kill -9. Below is a breakdown of each step in the command above: ps axuw # lists all processes on you PC. grep vim # lists only processes that are running VIM.

  22. Capcom rolls back Resident Evil Revelations update that caused

    Capcom is facing accusations from fans that it's quietly adding new DRM to its older games on PC, in what appears to be an attempt to crack down on the use of mods. But the process went from &quo

  23. Jerry Kill: Vanderbilt football hires New Mexico State coach to staff

    0:59. Vanderbilt football is in the process of hiring Jerry Kill, the former coach at New Mexico State, Minnesota and Northern Illinois, to an off-field staff role, according to a report from Pete ...

  24. why Ghost Process appears after kill -9

    3 Answers Sorted by: 4 From the manual page of ps: Z Defunct ("zombie") process, terminated but not reaped by its parent. That means that the parent didn't do a waitpid () for the child that died. Apart from waitpid (), you can avoid that by using a double fork when executing the child. Share

  25. N.J. cracking down on toll cheats, including 'ghost tag' users

    The rule-making process will offer an opportunity to fix problems in the first 18 months, he said. A second law signed by Murphy tightens up regulations on temporary license plates or paper tags ...

  26. How do you kill a Spark job from the CLI?

    Spark History Server provides REST API interface.Unfortunately, it only exposes monitoring capabilities for applications, jobs, stages, etc. There is also a REST Submission interface that provides capabilities to submit, kill and check up on status of the applications. It is undocumented AFAIK, and is only supported on Spark standalone and Mesos clusters, no YARN.