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Williams Street

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Williams Street (formally known as Ghost Planet Industries from 1994-1998, named after Space Ghost's home planet) is a division of Cartoon Network , which is owned by Turner Broadcasting, that created and programmed 4 programming blocks, Toonami , Miguzi , Saturday Video Entertainment System and Adult Swim . The studio is also responsible for co-producing most Adult Swim original series. Keith Crofford and Mike Lazzo oversee operations for the studio building.

The name originates from the location of the studios (which double as the home office for Adult Swim) at 1065 Williams Street NW in Atlanta, Georgia, near the current offices of Cartoon Network, TBS, and CNN. The street is named for early Atlanta settler Ammi Williams.

The studio's production logo features a wavy gray image of Space Ghost's fictional studio from Space Ghost Coast to Coast, with the words "Williams Street" beneath it. The soundtrack of Mark VII Limited's production logo (the drum roll and the two clinks of the hammer) is often used while the GPI/Williams Street production card is shown.

Early History [ ]

The Williams Street building was originally bought by Turner in 1976, Ted Turner bought the building and used it for his own television station WTCG. This new channel was the result of a recent UHF takeover. In December 1976, the first WTCG signal was beamed via satellite to its four cable systems located around Georgia. This broadcast was the first use of non-pay-service satellite transmission, an innovation that would come to revolutionize basic cable nationwide.

Starting out as a minor local channel, the station grew into success and was re-launched as WTBS in 1979. Then after a 5 year period, WTBS was renamed TBS Superstation. During this time, Turner also created CNN, a 24-hour news network. Both became standard for cable providers by the late 80s. Due to this success, the studio building became too small to operate as a headquarters. A new campus was built across the street for the expanding Turner empire. Upon completion, Turner launched Cartoon Network to showcase their recent acquisitions of the vast MGM and Hannah-Barbera library of cartoons.

When Turner moved out of the Williams Street building, they kept ownership, using it as a storage facility. Although no longer its main purpose, to this day Williams Street houses all the show tapes for Turner Networks. Appointed to run the building were veteran turner employees such as Keith Crofford, Andy Merril, and former mail-room employee Mike Lazzo. Although Cartoon Network was run at Hannah-Barbera studios at the time, certain duties were eventually controlled by the trio at Williams Street. One of their most important early tasks was producing host segments for The Moxy Pirate Show (later The Moxy Show ).

From 1990 to 1993, TBS started it's own original programming such as Captain Planet and 2 Stupid Dogs . This interested the team at Williams Street, and they all wished to create their own series. Towards the end of '93, the three mustered up the courage to approach Ted Turner with their ideas for Cartoon Network's original programming. It didn't go as planned and were eventually kicked out of Ted's office. According to Lazzo, they were clearly told that unless CN started making more money for Turner, they wouldn't be allowed funding or a chance. They didn't listen.

1993-1997 [ ]

They decided to produce their own series pilot. On a shoe-string budget, they tried to come up with compatible ideas. During brainstorming, they realized they could simply re-use footage of any animation in the turner library. They eventually settled on " Space Ghost & Dino Boy ". Because they felt it would fit, they paired it with Mike Lazzo's idea of a "Satirical talk show with a clueless host asking guests a stream of stupid questions." The final pilot featured rotoscoped animation superimposed on a simple background and used CNN interview footage for the live-action interview.

They went back to Turner and presented the pilot, and the series was then greenlit for a 10 episode season. Work began and the minor CN production/storage facility became its own studio, named after Coast to Coast's own in-show studio, Ghost Planet Industries. Soon the series was acquiring it's first C and D-list celebrity guests, small animation and writing crew, and voice actors. The voice actor for Space Ghost was local voice actor George Lowe, all other roles were done by the GPI crew. The series eventually premiered on April 14th, 1994. This marked Cartoon Network's first original series, and the first animated talk-show in history.

Due to it's more mature surreal humor, the series attracted a devoted cult audience. It's success led to a special which was simulcast on TBS, a special short for the VHS release of "The Mask" in which they interviewed Jim Carrey and director Charles Russell, and many more famous guests.

In 1995, TBS decided to come back into Ghost Planet Industries' life, as it was on its last legs for kids' programming. The studio was commissioned to produce a spinoff of Space Ghost Coast to Coast for TBS afternoons entitled Cartoon Planet . The show was hosted by Space Ghost, and also featured villains Zorak and Brak. The characters were featured in host segments surrounding 11-minute cartoon shorts every afternoon at 4:05 PM on TBS. The showcase lasted for 2 seasons, and finally, TBS decided to throw in the towel for kids programming, following the lead of TNT and USA. Cartoon Planet was moved over to Cartoon Network, where it enjoyed some late-night airtime until its inevitable booting from the air.

Meanwhile, Coast to Coast continued production. The show even featured appearances of guests and comedians who would later become much bigger successes like Adam Carolla, Colin Quinn, and Jon Stewart. By this time the entire network was growing immensely. The new half-hour original series were in production at Hanna-Barbera Studios in Los Angeles. Ghost Planet Industries had gone from being the center of the whole Turner operation to a tiny piece of it. In the late 90s, many Coast to Coast veterans had left or gone to Los Angeles to write professionally. Such writers included Matt Harrigan (who would later return to become an executive), Dan Vebber, Spike Feresten, Nell Scovell, Mark Banker, Rob Thomas, and Rich Dahm. Very few writers remained, and Coast to Coast began to stall a little. Show writer Evan Dorkin was also pre-occupied with other projects. Even more delays would come for the first original Ghost Planet Industries series, as the network began pre-production plans on its new block of adult programming that would launch in 3 years.

1997-Present [ ]

In 1997, fed up with previous incarnations of afternoon action programming, Ghost Planet Industries members Sean Akins and Jason DeMarco created a block of programming entitled Toonami. The block was packaged with CGI bumpers featuring the Ghost Planet Industries building (located on the Ghost Planet) and Space Ghost's very own Moltar as the host. The block contained already acquired action shows like ThunderCats , and acquired anime like Voltron and Robotech . Toonami was also home to premieres of a new Cartoon Network original series: The Real Adventures of Jonny Quest , an updated version of the old Hanna-Barbera Jonny Quest series. Toonami would eventually become a huge hit with the acquisition of Sailor Moon and Dragon Ball Z , where it flourished among pre-teens and young boys. This was a big factor in helping Cartoon Network reach more cable television households. Toonami also helped the push of more sophisticated Japanese anime into the US mainstream market with titles like Outlaw Star , The Big O , and Gundam Wing .

Ghost Planet Industries decided to take on the task of managing and producing these new adult shows, carrying on the tradition of spending as little money as possible. Since Cartoon Network was unsure of the success of their new adult programming block, they spent an incredibly small amount of money launching it. Coast to Coast veterans Dave Willis and Matt Maiellaro came to the table with their own idea of talking food detectives. Jim Fortier and Pete Smith had the idea of giving Hanna-Barbera villain character Brak a sitcom with also-villain Zorak, and Matt Thompson and Adam Reed of Atlanta-based production company 70/30 Productions produced their own pilot, using tapes of 1960s series Sealab 2020 which they had stolen from Turner Broadcasting after getting fired. Turner/GPI veteran Mike Lazzo was also promoted to the head of program development and scheduling at this time and became a much bigger figure in the network overall. Many believe it was his promotion that allowed the network to thrive as it did in the early new millennium. After many delays, season 6 of " Space Ghost Coast to Coast " finally aired in October of 1999. However, with the studio no longer focusing solely on Space Ghost, they figured it was time for a new name.

In fall of 1999, the building officially donned the name Williams Street, named after the street it was on. It would continue its duties under the guidance of Cartoon Network. As 2000 came, Toonami was stronger than ever, and the studio continued producing new cheap shows behind the scenes while Coast to Coast laid on the backburn er for a while, and wouldn't return to the airwaves until Spring 2001. In 2000, Cartoon Network launched its spinoff network Boomerang, and GPI staffer Andy Merrill was promoted to head of programming for the new channel. By the end of 2000, the new Williams Street pilots were contractually obligated to air, finished or not, and so they did in December on two early mornings. The pilots enjoyed a collective 0.2 audience share according to Nielsen Media Research. They were unadvertised and only known about by a select few. Months later, the first new Space Ghost Coast to Coast to air in over a year would hit the airwaves, and people got a taste of what was to come in September.

In summer 2001, the network officially announced the name of its new programming lineup for adults: Adult Swim. The name was taken after certain public pool hours in which kids were banned from the pool. Williams Street would be in charge of this lineup and previewed some of their new shows over the summer at San Diego Comic-Con. On September 2, 2001, the block premiered to a limited audience. The new shows retained the Williams Street tradition of cheap, limited animation, with dialogue-based humor. The block also aired former UPN series Home Movies , which was produced by Soup2Nuts in Boston. Adult Swim also premiered Cowboy Bebop to the US audience, thus creating a feasible adult outlet for Japanese anime to a wide audience with minimal editing for content. For the next year or so, these shows would continue to gain steam and a cult fanbase. Both Williams Street produced blocks Toonami and Adult Swim were helping the network into many more homes. It wouldn't be until the acquisitions of canceled FOX series Futurama , and soon Family Guy , when Adult Swim would be put on the media map. During this time, Mike Lazzo stepped down from his network duties to become the SVP in charge of Adult Swim. With Lazzo in charge, Adult Swim enjoyed great success throughout 2003. Meanwhile, Matt Harrigan set up the Williams Street West studio in Los Angeles to write and produce a new season of Space Ghost Coast to Coast . Coast to Coast finally returned for another season after a long gestation period (and would finally get long-wanted guest, William Shatner). Six episodes were aired from the end of 2003 to the beginning of 2004, and featured guests like Jeff Probst and Triumph the Insult Comic Dog. Meanwhile, Toonami would see the end of its long-running powerhouse of a show, Dragon Ball Z .

2004 would see the end of the 7-year old Williams Street-produced block Toonami on weekdays, when it moved to Saturday nights replacing the temporary action block, Saturday Video Entertainment System . Cartoon Network had recently gotten new management due to corporate shufflings above and decided that it was time for a new gender-neutral-lite action block on weekday afternoons. Thus, Williams Street created Miguzi , a new all-ages skewing action/adventure block. Like Toonami, this block also featured CG-animated packaging and bumps. Meanwhile, Williams Street's oldest show Space Ghost: Coast to Coast was put on indefinite hiatus with the closing down of Williams Street West. Even with Matt Harrigan returning to Atlanta, the crew was too busy working on other projects to do Space Ghost. Adult Swim continued growing with viewership rivaling the kids' programming. With "Ghost" gone, as well as Adult Swim day 1-ers The Brak Show and Home Movies , Williams Street began to seek out other production companies in places like Los Angeles to produce shows for Adult Swim at a low cost. The studio began to manage production now of other shows for the block. The crew was determined to find its big breakout hit and was searching high and low for show ideas.

In 2005, Adult Swim came with a slew of new shows, many produced by or managed by Williams Street. The studio managed new half-hour series Stroker and Hoop (produced across the street at Turner Studios), ratings winner Robot Chicken , and ratings not-so-winner Tom Goes to the Mayor . Williams Street also produced new original comedies Squidbillies , 12 Oz. Mouse , and Perfect Hair Forever .

In 2005, Adult Swim was still a ratings powerhouse, with new series The Boondocks and old series Aqua Teen Hunger Force scoring big. On the Toonami side, the block acquired Japanese shonen hits Naruto and One Piece , which enjoyed great success. Toonami also premiered their very first original series, IGPX, which Williams Street managed the production of while being produced in Japan at Production I.G. With all the new shows, Williams Street had to be totally renovated. The building was given new offices and new facilities for the staff to enjoy. The new facilities (dubbed "Williams Street 2.0") are located in what was once the CNN studio annex.

Unfortunately, IGPX had very little success, and the show ended up moving to Friday nights off of Toonami, thus ending the first Williams Street production for Toonami. To add to that, it was announced at the 2007 Cartoon Network upfront that Miguzi would be removed from the schedule and replaced with a new interactive block called Master Control, which was not produced by Williams Street.

In 2007, Williams Street formed their own music label, "Williams Street Records", which is the operating name for the LLC. Under that label, they have released original works of music, some of which are related to their shows. The label is run by Jason Demarco aka DJ Clarknova.

In 2008 with Toonami's ratings waning the block was canceled on September 20, 2008, thus ending Cartoon Network's longest-running block (though it was eventually brought back in 2012 for Adult Swim).

  • 1 List of original series broadcast by Cartoon Network
  • 2 ACME Night
  • 3 Checkered Past

Ghost Planet Industries

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Ghost Planet Industries

Ghost Planet Industries was a building on Ghost Planet that was originally the main stage for Space Ghost Coast to Coast and would later be used by Moltar to broadcast Toonami from March 17, 1997 to March 10, 1997. July 1999.

History [ ]

Moltar would send a satellite (Clyde 49) through a cannon-like device on the planet's surface to Earth to send Toonami 's transmissions. Moltar would direct the broadcasts from a central broadcast room where he would also do his speeches and game reviews. Moltar would later buy a spaceship in order to more easily transmit the Toonami block to Earth, which he dubbed the Ghost Planet Spaceship Absolution, but unable to execute it himself, he handed over the controls to a robot named TOM 1. (Toonami Operations Module) who would host Toonami from then on. Ghost Planet Industries, Moltar and Clyde 49 disappeared from the block in 1999 when TOM and Absolution officially took over all hosting responsibilities for Toonami.

  • 1 Nathan Explosion
  • 2 Williams Street
  • 3 Dr. Rockzo
  • WarnerMedia production studios
  • Acquired media
  • Turner Broadcasting System
  • Production companies

Williams Street

  • Companies established in 1994
  • Cartoon Network
  • Warner Bros. Discovery
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Williams Street Productions, LLC , operating under the name Williams Street (previously known as Ghost Planet Industries from 1994–1998, named after Space Ghost's home planet), is a division of Cartoon Network, which is owned by Turner Broadcasting System, an operational unit of Warner Bros. Discovery. The studio is the in-house production arm of Adult Swim, as well as the network's main headquarters. Keith Crofford and Mike Lazzo oversee operations for the studio building.

  • 1 Name and logo
  • 2.1 TV animated series
  • 2.2 Former/current live-action series
  • 2.3 Former/current internet series
  • 2.4 Former/current blocks
  • 2.5 Failed pilots
  • 2.6 Future series and shows in development
  • 2.7 Feature films
  • 2.8 Specials
  • 4 External Links

Name and logo [ ]

The name originates from the location of the studios (which double as the home office for Adult Swim) at 1065 Williams Street NW in Atlanta, Georgia, near the current offices of TBS and TNT on Techwood Drive. They were the initial base for WTBS when it launched as a superstation in the mid-60's; it and other Turner operations moved into the Techwood campus (which was originally a country club, then the first HQ for CNN soon after CNN moved into the CNN Center in downtown Atlanta) in the early 1980's. The street is named for early Atlanta settler Ammi Williams.

The studio's production logo features a wavy gray image of Space Ghost's fictional studio from Space Ghost Coast to Coast, with the words "Williams Street" beneath it. The soundtrack of Mark VII Limited's production logo (the drum roll and the two clinks of the hammer) is often used while the GPI/Williams Street production card is shown.

Filmography [ ]

Tv animated series [ ], former/current live-action series [ ], former/current internet series [ ], former/current blocks [ ], failed pilots [ ], future series and shows in development [ ], feature films [ ], specials [ ].

  • Aqua Teen Hunger Force Zombie Ninja Pro-Am (2007)
  • Harvey Birdman: Attorney at Law (2008)

Williams Street formed their own music label, Williams Street Records. The label was created after Jason Demarco, Adult Swim's vice president of strategic marketing and promotions, worked on Danger Doom, a project with Danger Mouse and MF Doom in 2005. Danger Mouse had previously worked on the music for Toonami and wanted to do an album that sampled that work. The group suggested the idea to Mike Lazzo; the project was successful. William Street Records now releases a majority of the music related to their shows. The label is managed by Demarco.

External Links [ ]

  • Williams Street at the Internet Movie Database

Template:Williams Street

  • 1 Tooned Out
  • 3 Missy Cooper

Williams Street Productions

Ghost Planet Industries (1995)

  • July 28, 1995-December 25, 1998, May 7, 2001-January 1, 2003: " GHOST PLANET INDUSTRIES ", in a "ghost" font is below the building.
  • October 22, 1999-: " WILLIAMS STREET "
  • There is also an inverted version of the GPI logo with the gray BG and the building in white on season 7 of SGC2C. The first episode of S7 , "Kentucky Nightmare", used an more slightly distorted version of that variant, along with S8 episode, "Baffler Meal".
  • On recent Adult Swim shows from 2012 and onwards, the logo has (barely readable) Cartoon Network copyright information, and it does not cut to the Cartoon Network "Skull". Also, the logo has been converted to letterbox.
  • On the first episode of Harvey Birdman, Attorney at Law (the only episode of the show to have this logo), the logo is tinted blue .
  • On the Space Ghost episode "Flipmode", the logo is in static.
  • On The Eric Andre Show , "Bird Up", Eric Andre in a green suit with a parrot appears at the bottom left corner of the screen. He says "Yah Boobay" over and over again.
  • On the Children's Hospital episode "The Show You Watch", the logo is redesigned to fit in with the 50s motif of the episode, like all the other logos along with it. The logo is now flat, simplistic, and more cartoony, sort of resembling a UPA/H-B background design, and the "WILLIAMS STREET" text is also in a different font. The logo does not wave in this variant, and thus is completely still, no animation at all.
  • On Brak Presents The Brak Show Starring Brak , the logo is on a paper taped to the background.
  • On The Eric Andre show season 2 finale, the logo has a darker sound that gets slightly louder, the logo also appears more fuzzy than usual.
  • On Mister America , the logo appears in the end credits alongside the Magnolia Pictures and Abso Lutely Productions logos.
  • In other cases, it used the closing theme of the show (If you listen closely, certain shows (such as early seasons of Robot Chicken ) still have a bit of Master Shake from ATHF yelling "dance!" really quickly which is taken from him saying "Dancing Is Forbidden!" from the first episode of ATHF ).
  • Sometimes, it's silent. One example is the SGC2C S3 episode "Sharrock" to observe the memory of Sonny Sharrock, the show's musician.
  • On Squidbillies , it's the respective ending theme of the show.
  • On the SGC2C S4 episode "Boatshow", Space Ghost is heard underneath announcing "This has been a Ghost Planet Industries production. (does a spit take) That's what I did in rehearsal, and everybody laughed."
  • On the SGC2C S7 episode "Kentucky Nightmare", the music is a long held out metal guitar riff played 2 times in place of the hammer strikes. A similar variant appeared on the S8 episode, "Baffler Meal", but also includes Space Ghost yelling "NOOOO!!!".
  • On The Eric Andre Show 's episode "the Eric Andre Show 15", the logo cuts out early and we hear the 2nd hammer strike while the screen was black.

Williams Street (Squidbillies Variant)

  • On the Sealab 2021 episode "Murphy Murph and the Feng Shui Bunch", Master Shake from Aqua Teen Hunger Force (voiced by Dana Snyder) breaks the Williams Street logo, along with the 70/30 Productions and the Cartoon Network Productions logos.
  • Stroker and Hoop used a copyright stamp below the logo.
  • A sepia variant exists.
  • When this logo debuted on the SGC2C episode "Chambraigne", we hear three strikes of the hammer.
  • On the "Murphy Murph and the Feng Shui Bunch" variant, Master Shake and Meatwad (off screen, voiced by Dave Willis) have this conversation:
Master Shake: "Seventy-Thirty. Is this yours?" Meatwad: "That's not mine!" Master Shake: "'Cause it's gone!" Meatwad: "You're breaking somebody else's things now." Master Shake: "It's cheap looking and it's outta here. What kind of crap is this, did an elephant paint this?!"

Williams Street/Turner Studios (2000)

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Williams Street

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Williams Street is a production company that is currently owned by the Warner Bros. Television Studios division of Warner Bros., a unit of Warner Bros. Discovery. It was formerly by Turner Broadcasting System. Williams Street was formerly known as Ghost Planet Industries after Space Ghost 's show in 1994-1999. All of Adult Swim is produced by Williams Street. Keith Crofford oversees operations for the studio building, which also houses the Cartoon Network offices. Mike Lazzo oversaw operations for the studio alongside Crofford until 2019, when Lazzo retired from the company and Crofford exited the following year, while he was succeeded by Suzanna Makkos in 2021.

The name of the company is mainly named after the street that it lies on which is Williams Street in Atlanta, Georgia. This company is in the same building of Ted Turner who founded TBS , CNN and Cartoon Network.

The building in the logo is an artistic version of the studio it started in. The building in real life is just a little different then the logo on television. For example, the building says TBS on the front, the building is much longer and it is more elevated in the center. The companies' building is right across the street from TBS headquarters.

The audio in the background of the logo is created by Jack Webb's production company Mark VII Limited.

The Williams Street logo is shown for about five seconds and old shows are occasionally followed by a vanity card of a skull and crossbones with the old Cartoon Network symbol on the mouth, which was ended in 2004. The symbol was not used until after Ghost Planet Industries.

  • 12 oz. Mouse (2005-2006; 2018; 2020)
  • Apollo Gauntlet (2017)
  • Aqua Teen Hunger Force (2000-2015)
  • Assy McGee (With Soup2Nuts ) (2006-2008)
  • Black Dynamite (2012-2015)
  • Brad Neely's Harg Nallin' Sclopio Peepio (With Titmouse, Inc. ) (2016)
  • Brak Presents the Brak Show Starring Brak (2000)
  • The Brak Show (2000-2003)
  • Cartoon Planet (1995-1999)
  • China, IL (With Titmouse, Inc.) (2011-2015)
  • The Drinky Crow Show (With Mirari Films) (2007-2009)
  • Fat Guy Stuck in Internet (2008)
  • FishCenter Live (2014-2020)
  • Frisky Dingo (With 70/30 Productions ) (2006-2008)
  • Harvey Birdman, Attorney at Law (With Turner Studios) (2000-2007)
  • Immortal Grand Prix (With Production I.G ) (2003-2005)
  • Lucy, the Daughter of the Devil (2005-2007)
  • Mary Shelley's Frankenhole (With ShadowMachine and Starburns Industries ) (2010-2012)
  • Metalocalypse (With Titmouse Inc.) (2006-2013)
  • Mike Tyson Mysteries (With Warner Bros. Animation ) (2014-2020)
  • Minoriteam (2006)
  • Mongo Wrestling Alliance (2011)
  • Moral Orel (With ShadowMachine) (2005-2008; 2012)
  • Mr. Pickles (2014-2019)
  • Perfect Hair Forever (2004-2007; 2014)
  • Rick and Morty (With Starburns Industries and Green Portal Productions ) (2013-Present)
  • Robot Chicken (With ShadowMachine, Stoopid Monkey and Sony Pictures Digital ) (2005-Present)
  • Samurai Jack (2017)
  • Saul of the Mole Men (2007)
  • Sealab 2021 (With 70/30 Productions) (2000-2005)
  • Soul Quest Overdrive (2011)
  • Space Ghost Coast to Coast (1994-2004)
  • Squidbillies (2005-2021)
  • Stroker and Hoop (With Turner Studios) (2004-2005)
  • Superjail! (With Augenblick Studios and Titmouse, Inc.) (2008-2014)
  • The Jellies! (With Augenblick Studios) (2017-2019)
  • The Venture Bros. (With World Leaders and Astrobase GO!) (2003-2018)
  • Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job! (With Absolutely) (2007-2010; 2017)
  • Titan Maximum (With ShadowMachine and Stoopid Monkey) (2009)
  • Tom Goes to the Mayor (With Dipshot Films/Absolutely) (2004-2006)
  • Xavier: Renegade Angel (With PFFR ) (2007-2009)
  • The Xtacles (With 70/30 Productions) (2008)
  • Young Person's Guide to History (With Funny Garbage) (2008)
  • Aqua Teen Hunger Force Colon Movie Film for Theaters (2007)
  • Adult Swim Brain Trust (TV Special) (2004)
  • Korgoth of Barbaria (With Cartoon Network Studios ) (TV Pilot) (2006)
  • Let's Fish (With Titmouse, Inc.) (TV Pilot) (2007)
  • Spacecataz (TV Pilot) (2004)
  • Stiff (TV Pilot) (2007)
  • That Crook'd 'Sipp (TV Pilot) (2007)
  • Williams Street Records

Gallery [ ]

Williams Street Productions, LLC.

  • 1 Come and Learn with Pibby!
  • 2 The Dawn Is Your Enemy

Williams Street

  • View history

Williams Street (formerly known as Ghost Planet Industries from 1994-1998, named after Space Ghost's home planet) is a division of Cartoon Network , which is owned by Turner Broadcasting, that created and programmed 4 programming blocks, Toonami , Miguzi , Saturday Video Entertainment System and Adult Swim . The studio is also responsible for co-producing most Adult Swim original series. Keith Crofford and Mike Lazzo oversee operations for the studio building.

The name originates from the location of the studios (which double as the home office for Adult Swim) at 1065 Williams Street NW in Atlanta, Georgia, near the current offices of Cartoon Network, TBS, and CNN. The street is named for early Atlanta settler Ammi Williams.

The studio's production logo features a wavy gray image of Space Ghost's fictional studio from Space Ghost Coast to Coast, with the words "Williams Street" beneath it. The soundtrack of Mark VII Limited's production logo (the drum roll and the two clinks of the hammer) is often used while the GPI/Williams Street production card is shown.

Early History [ ]

The Williams Street building was originally bought by Turner in 1976, Ted Turner bought the building and used it for his own television station WTCG. This new channel was the result of a recent UHF takeover. In December 1976, the first WTCG signal was beamed via satellite to its four cable systems located around Georgia. This broadcast was the first use of non-pay-service satellite transmission, an innovation that would come to revolutionize basic cable nationwide.

Starting out as a minor local channel, the station grew into success and was re-launched as WTBS in 1979. Then after a 5 year period, WTBS was renamed TBS Superstation. During this time, Turner also created CNN, a 24-hour news network. Both became standard for cable providers by the late 80s. Due to this success, the studio building became too small to operate as a headquarters. A new campus was built across the street for the expanding Turner empire. Upon completion, Turner launched Cartoon Network to showcase their recent acquisitions of the vast MGM and Hannah-Barbera library of cartoons.

When Turner moved out of the Williams Street building, they kept ownership, using it as a storage facility. Although no longer it's main purpose, to this day Williams Street houses all the show tapes for Turner Networks. Appointed to run the building were veteran turner employees such as Keith Crofford, Andy Merril, and former mail-room employee Mike Lazzo. Although Cartoon Network was run at Hannah-Barbera studios at the time, certain duties were eventually controlled by the trio at Williams Street. One of their most important early tasks were producing host segments for The Moxy Pirate Show (later The Moxy Show ).

From 1990 to 1993, TBS started it's own original programming such as Captain Planet and 2 Stupid Dogs . This interested the team at Williams Street, and they all wished to create their own series. Towards the end of '93, the three mustered up courage to approach Ted Turner with their ideas for Cartoon Network original programming. It didn't go as planned, and were eventually kicked out of Ted's office. According to Lazzo, they were clearly told that unless CN started making more money for Turner, they wouldn't be allowed funding or a chance. They didn't listen.

1993-1997 [ ]

They decided to produce their own series pilot. On a shoe-string budget, they tried to come up with compatible ideas. During brain storming, they realized they could simply re-use footage of any animation in the turner library. They eventually settled on " Space ghost & Dino Boy ". Because they felt it would fit, they paired it with Mike Lazzo's idea of a "Satirical talk show with a clueless host asking guests a stream of stupid questions." The final pilot featured rotoscoped animation super-imposed on a simple background, and used CNN interview footage for the live-action interview.

They went back to Turner and presented the pilot, and the series was then greenlit for a 10 episode season. Work began and the minor CN production/storage facility became it's own studio, named after Coast to Coast's own in-show studio, Ghost Planet Industries. Soon the series was acquiring it's first C and D-list celebrity guests, small animation and writing crew, and voice actors. The voice actor for Space Ghost was local voice actor George Lowe, all other roles were done by the GPI crew. The series eventually premiered on April 14th, 1994. This marked Cartoon Network's first original series, and the first animated talk-show in history.

Due to it's more mature surreal humor, the series attracted a devoted cult audience. It's success led to a special which was simulcast on TBS, a special short for the VHS release of "The Mask" in which they interviewed Jim Carrey and director Charles Russell, and much more famous guests.

In 1995, TBS decided to come back into Ghost Planet Industries' life, as it was on its last legs for kids' programming. The studio was commissioned to produce a spinoff of Space Ghost Coast to Coast for TBS afternoons entitled Cartoon Planet . The show was hosted by Space Ghost, and also featured villains Zorak and Brak. The characters were featured in host segments surrounding 11 minute cartoon shorts every afternoon at 4:05 PM on TBS. The showcase lasted for 2 seasons, and finally TBS decided to throw in the towel for kids programming, following the lead of TNT and USA. Cartoon Planet was moved over to Cartoon Network, where it enjoyed some late-night airtime until its inevitable booting from the air.

Meanwhile, Coast to Coast continued production. The show even featured appearances of guests and comedians who would later become much bigger successes like Adam Carolla, Colin Quinn, and Jon Stewart. By this time the entire network was growing immensely. New half-hour original series were in production at Hanna-Barbera Studios in Los Angeles. Ghost Planet Industries had gone from being the center of the whole Turner operation to a tiny piece of it. In the late 90s, many Coast to Coast veterans had left or gone to Los Angeles to write professionally. Such writers included Matt Harrigan (who would later return to become an executive), Dan Vebber, Spike Feresten, Nell Scovell, Mark Banker, Rob Thomas, and Rich Dahm. Very few writers remained, and Coast to Coast began to stall a little. Show writer Evan Dorkin was also pre-occupied with other projects. Even more delays would come for the first original Ghost Planet Industries series, as the network began pre-production plans on its new block of adult programming that would launch in 3 years.

1997-Present [ ]

In 1997, fed up with previous incarnations of afternoon action programming, Ghost Planet Industries members Sean Akins and Jason DeMarco created a block of programming entitled Toonami. The block was packaged with CGI bumpers featuring the Ghost Planet Industries building (located on the Ghost Planet) and Space Ghost's very own Moltar as the host. The block contained already acquired action shows like Thundercats , and acquired anime like Voltron and Robotech . Toonami was also home to premieres of a new Cartoon Network original series: The Real Adventures of Jonny Quest , an updated version of the old Hanna-Barbera Jonny Quest series. Toonami would eventually become a huge hit with the acquisition of Sailor Moon and Dragon Ball Z , where it flourished among pre-teens and young boys. This was a big factor in helping Cartoon Network reach more cable television households. Toonami also helped the push of more sophisticated Japanese anime into the US mainstream market with titles like Outlaw Star , The Big O , and Gundam Wing .

Ghost Planet Industries decided to take on the task of managing and producing these new adult shows, carrying on the tradition of spending as little money as possible. Since Cartoon Network was unsure of the success of their new adult programming block, they spent an incredibly small amount of money launching it. Coast to Coast veterans Dave Willis and Matt Maiellaro came to the table with their own idea of talking food detectives. Jim Fortier and Pete Smith had the idea of giving Hanna-Barbera villain character Brak a sitcom with also-villain Zorak, and Matt Thompson and Adam Reed of New York City based production company 70/30 Productions produced their own pilot, using tapes of 1960s series Sealab 2020 which they had stolen from Turner Broadcasting after getting fired. Turner/GPI veteran Mike Lazzo was also promoted to the head of program development and scheduling at this time, and became a much bigger figure in the network overall. Many believe it was his promotion that allowed the network to thrive as it did in the early new millennium. After many delays, season 6 of " Space Ghost Coast to Coast " finally aired in October of 1999. However, with the studio no longer focusing solely on Space Ghost, they figured it was time for a new name.

In fall of 1999, the building officially donned the name Williams Street, named after the street it was on. It would continue its duties under the guidance of Cartoon Network. As 2000 came, Toonami was stronger than ever, and the studio continued producing new cheap shows behind the scenes while Coast to Coast laid on the backburner for a while, and wouldn't return to the airwaves until Spring 2001. In 2000, Cartoon Network launched its spinoff network Boomerang, and GPI staffer Andy Merrill was promoted to head of programming for the new channel. By the end of 2000, the new Williams Street pilots were contractually obligated to air, finished or not, and so they did in December on two early mornings. The pilots enjoyed a collective 0.2 audience share according to Nielsen Media Research. They were unadvertised and only known about by a select few. Months later, the first new Space Ghost Coast to Coast to air in over a year would hit the airwaves, and people got a taste of what was to come in September.

In summer 2001, the network officially announced the name of its new programming lineup for adults: Adult Swim. The name was taken after certain public pool hours in which kids were banned from the pool. Williams Street would be in charge of this lineup, and previewed some of their new shows over the summer at San Diego Comic-Con. On September 2, 2001, the block premiered to a limited audience. The new shows retained the Williams Street tradition of cheap, limited animation, with dialogue-based humor. The block also aired former UPN series Home Movies , which was produced by Soup2Nuts in Boston. Adult Swim also premiered Cowboy Bebop to the US audience, thus creating a feasible adult outlet for Japanese anime to a wide audience with minimal editing for content. For the next year or so, these shows would continue to gain steam and a cult fanbase. Both Williams Street produced blocks Toonami and Adult Swim were helping the network into many more homes. It wouldn't be until the acquisitions of cancelled FOX series Futurama , and soon Family Guy , when Adult Swim would be put on the media map. During this time, Mike Lazzo stepped down from his network duties to become the SVP in charge of Adult Swim. With Lazzo in charge, Adult Swim enjoyed great success throughout 2003. Meanwhile, Matt Harrigan set up the Williams Street West studio in Los Angeles to write and produce a new season of Space Ghost Coast to Coast . Coast to Coast finally returned for another season after a long gestation period (and would finally get long-wanted guest, William Shatner). Six episodes were aired from the end of 2003 to the beginning of 2004, and featured guests like Jeff Probst and Triumph the Insult Comic Dog. Meanwhile, Toonami would see the end of its long running powerhouse of a show, Dragon Ball Z .

2004 would see the end of the 7-year old Williams Street-produced block Toonami on weekdays, when it moved to Saturday nights replacing the temporary action block, Saturday Video Entertainment System . Cartoon Network had recently gotten new management due to corporate shufflings above, and decided that it was time for a new gender-neutral-lite action block on weekday afternoons. Thus, Williams Street created Miguzi , a new all-ages skewing action/adventure block. Like Toonami, this block also featured CG-animated packaging and bumps. Meanwhile, Williams Street's oldest show Space Ghost: Coast to Coast was put on indefinite hiatus with the closing down of Williams Street West. Even with Matt Harrigan returning to Atlanta, the crew was too busy working on other projects to do Space Ghost. Adult Swim continued growing with viewership rivaling the kids' programming. With "Ghost" gone, as well as Adult Swim day 1-ers The Brak Show and Home Movies , Williams Street began to seek out other production companies in places like Los Angeles to produce shows for Adult Swim at a low cost. The studio began to manage production now of other shows for the block. The crew was determined to find its big breakout hit, and was searching high and low for show ideas.

In 2005, Adult Swim came with a slew of new shows, many produced by or managed by Williams Street. The studio managed new half hour series Stroker and Hoop (produced across the street at Turner Studios), ratings winner Robot Chicken , and ratings not-so-winner Tom Goes to the Mayor . Williams Street also produced new original comedies Squidbillies , 12 Oz. Mouse , and Perfect Hair Forever .

In 2005, Adult Swim was still a ratings powerhouse, with new series The Boondocks and old series Aqua Teen Hunger Force scoring big. On the Toonami side, the block acquired Japanese shonen hits Naruto and One Piece , which enjoyed great success. Toonami also premiered their very first original series, IGPX , which Williams Street managed the production of while being produced in Japan at Production I.G. With all the new shows, Williams Street had to be totally renovated. The building was given new offices and new facilities for the staff to enjoy. The new facilities (dubbed "Williams Street 2.0") are located in what was once the CNN studio annex.

Unfortunately, IGPX had very little success, and the show ended up moving to Friday nights off of Toonami, thus ending the first Williams Street production for Toonami. To add to that, it was announced at the 2007 Cartoon Network upfront that Miguzi would be removed from the schedule and replaced with a new interactive block called Master Control, which was not produced by Williams Street.

In 2007, Williams Street formed their own music label, "Williams Street Records", which is the operating name for the LLC. Under that label, they have released original works of music, some of which are related to their shows. The label is run by Jason Demarco aka DJ Clarknova.

In 2008 with Toonami's ratings waning the block was cancelled on September 20, 2008, thus ending Cartoon Network's longest running block.

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Williams Street

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Williams Street is a production company currently owned by Warner Bros. Television Studios. Williams Street was formerly known as Ghost Planet Industries after Space Ghost: Coast to Coast in 1994-1999. All Adult Swim content is produced by Williams Street. The two people who were primarily responsible for looking after the corporation were Mike Lazzo and Keith Crofford . Mike Lazzo and Keith Crofford retired from the company in December 2019 and December 2020. The current president is Michael Ouweleen.

The company's current name refers to its building's address, which also serves as the in-house studio of Adult Swim.

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ghost planet industries

Williams Street

In 1999, Ghost Planet Industries was renamed to Williams Street and it expanded to produce anything beyond SGC2C and Toonami, which included the new Midnight Run and Rising Sun blocks. Named after 1065 Williams Street NW in Atlanta, Georgia, the company heralded the creation of Adult Swim in 2001, with such shows like Harvey Birdman: Attorney at Law and Aqua Teen Hunger Force . The company also opened a small subsidiary in 2003 as Williams Street West so that their creative director, Matt Harrigan could work for Viacom International and Williams Street without having to return to Atlanta constantly. It closed its doors shortly after he stopped working for Viacom (though the subsidiary was revived in 2017, however, it was closed again in 2020). All of the company's shows are currently aired on Adult Swim .

Logo (October 8, 1999- )

Standard early version

Standard early version

Version with copyright notice

Version with copyright notice

Standard fullscreen logo

Standard fullscreen logo

Wavy version

Wavy version

Version with 2012 copyright design

Version with 2012 copyright design

Version with outline-less copyright design

Version with outline-less copyright design

Standard widescreen logo

Standard widescreen logo

Version with Birdgirl copyright design

Version with Birdgirl copyright design

Version with Off the Air copyright design

Version with Off the Air copyright design

Redrawn variant

Redrawn variant

Visuals: Same as the Ghost Planet Industries logo, except the text reads " WILLIAMS STREET " in a Futura-like font.

Early Variant: Some early shows with the logo contain the letters farther apart (in a proper Futura font), the waving is bigger and it has a smoother and faster rate, and had better image quality.

Trivia: This early logo variant was featured in an Adult Swim bump from 2010.

  • From 2018-2022, the "A Time Warner Company." part of the byline is replaced with "A WarnerMedia Company.", the rest of the logo though is the same. The reason for this is due to the AT&T acquisition of Time Warner which changed the latter's name to WarnerMedia on June 14, 2018.
  • On season 2 of Birdgirl , the copyright information is different, longer, and in a different font (presumably Haettenschweiler or Impact?) and it no longer waves like the logo. Most of the time, the logo is slightly moved up to make room for said copyright information.
  • On Mister America , the logo appears in the end credits alongside the Magnolia Pictures and Abso Lutely Productions logos.
  • On the first episode of Blade Runner: Black Lotus , the copyright information appears for a split-second before disappearing.
  • On Your Pretty Face Is Going To Hell: The Cartoon , Aqua Teen Forever: Plantasm , and the Adult Swim Yule Log , the logo is redrawn and the " WILLIAMS STREET " text is in a different font.
  • On the pilot of Stroker & Hoop , the early version has a copyright notice below the logo.

Technique: Same as the Ghost Planet Industries logo.

Audio: Same as the Ghost Planet Industries logo, but starting in late 1999, it was cut down to two hammer strikes.

Audio Variants:

  • In other cases, it used the closing theme of the show (if you listen closely, certain shows (such as early seasons of Robot Chicken ) still have a bit of Master Shake from ATHF (voiced by Dana Snyder) yelling "Dance!" really quickly, which is taken from him saying "Dancing is forbidden!" from the first episode of ATHF ).
  • Sometimes, it's silent.
  • On Squidbillies , it's the respective ending theme of the show.
  • On The Eric Andre Show episode "The Eric Andre Show 15", the logo cuts out early and we hear the 2nd hammer strike while the screen is black.
  • On The Eric Andre Show season 2 finale, the logo has a darker sound that gets slightly louder.
  • On Aqua Something You Know Whatever (the ninth season of ATHF ), a random quote from the specific episode is right after a hammer strike.
  • On the China, IL episode "Dream Reamer", a "Skull!" sound from the 2001 Cartoon Network Productions logo is heard.
  • On the season 3 finale of Rick and Morty on Netflix, the French audio track has a low pitched version, which is also the case for the other logos before it and the whole episode.
  • On the Off the Air episode "Moon", musak is heard instead.
  • On the Your Pretty Face Is Going To Hell episode "Fried Alive", a shotgun sound effect with a splatter is heard due to the end of the episode, in which a Hell employee tries to commit suicide by shooting himself through the mouth.
  • On the Gemusetto episode "Episode Two: A# Minor", the tail end of the next-week music and the man's dialogue is heard instead.
  • On King Star King , a hammer strike is slowed down.

Availability:

  • Can be seen on most shows Williams Street has produced, and SGC2C episodes from season 6.
  • It is also seen at the beginning of Aqua Teen Hunger Force: Colon Movie Film for Theaters .
  • It can also be seen on the pilot episode of Harvey Birdman, Attorney at Law , Rick and Morty , as well as season 5 of Samurai Jack , and the 2 new FLCL seasons (Progressive and Alternative) as well.
  • Strangely, this logo does not appear on IGPX (both the 2003 microseries and the full 26-episode show from 2005), probably due to the fact that the show aired on CN's Toonami rather than on Adult Swim.
  • The early version was first seen on the SGC2C episode "Chambraigne", and is regularly seen on Sealab 2021 , Squidbillies (seasons 1 and 2; except for "Giant Foam Dickhat Trouble"), Frisky Dingo , Lucy: The Daughter of the Devil (starting with the second episode) and season 2 of Delocated . It was also seen on the first episode of Stroker and Hoop .

Legacy: A well-known logo among Adult Swim fans due to its sampling of a logo theme from the past, its concept, and its longevity.

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Space Ghost Coast To Coast - The Mask (1994)

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COMMENTS

  1. Williams Street

    Williams Street Productions, LLC, [1] d/b/a Williams Street and formerly known as Ghost Planet Industries, is an American animation and live action television production studio owned by the Warner Bros. Television Studios division of Warner Bros., a unit of Warner Bros. Discovery.

  2. Williams Street

    Williams Street (formally known as Ghost Planet Industries from 1994-1998, named after Space Ghost's home planet) is a division of Cartoon Network, which is owned by Turner Broadcasting, that created and programmed 4 programming blocks, Toonami, Miguzi, Saturday Video Entertainment System and Adult Swim.

  3. Ghost Planet Industries

    Ghost Planet Industries was a building on the Ghost Planet that was originally the main setting of Space Ghost Coast to Coast, and would later be used by Moltar to broadcast Toonami from March 17, 1997 to July 10, 1999. Moltar would send a satellite (Clyde 49) via a cannon-like device on the...

  4. Williams Street

    Williams Street Productions, LLC, d/b/a Williams Street and formerly known as Ghost Planet Industries, is an American animation and live action television production studio owned by the Warner Bros. Television Studios division of Warner Bros., a unit of Warner Bros. Discovery.

  5. Ghost Planet Industries

    Ghost Planet Industries was a building on Ghost Planet that was originally the main stage for Space Ghost Coast to Coast and would later be used by Moltar to broadcast Toonami from March 17, 1997 to March 10, 1997. July 1999. Moltar would send a satellite (Clyde 49) through a cannon-like device...

  6. Ghost Planet Industries

    Ghost Planet Industries was originally formed in 1994 by two employers of TBS Productions, Mike Lazzo and Keith Crofford, to produce Space Ghost: Coast to Coast for Cartoon Network.

  7. Mark VII Limited

    Mark VII Limited (formerly Mark VII Productions, pronounced "Mark 7") was the production company of actor and filmmaker Jack Webb, and was active from 1951 to his death in 1982. Many of its series were produced in association with Universal Television; most of them aired on the NBC television network in the United States.

  8. Williams Street

    Williams Street Productions, LLC, operating under the name Williams Street (previously known as Ghost Planet Industries from 1994-1998, named after Space Ghost's home planet), is a division of Cartoon Network, which is owned by Turner Broadcasting System, an operational unit of Warner Bros. Discovery.

  9. Ghost Planet Industries

    Ghost Planet Industries was a building on Ghost Planet that was originally the main stage for Space Ghost Coast to Coast and would later be used by Moltar to broadcast Toonami from March 17, 1997 to March 10, 1997. July 1999.

  10. Williams Street

    Williams Street Productions, LLC, d/b/a Williams Street and formerly known as Ghost Planet Industries, is an American animation and live action television production studio owned by the Warner Bros. Television Studios division of Warner Bros., a unit of Warner Bros. Discovery. The studio is the in-house production arm of Adult Swim . Mike Lazzo and Keith Crofford oversaw operations for the ...

  11. Ghost Planet Industries / Cartoon Network (2003)

    Ghost Planet Industries / Cartoon Network (2003) - YouTube Hello, God. Are you there? Is this heaven? Or am I in television?From the SGC2C episode "Baffler Meal", originally aired New Year's...

  12. Williams Street Productions

    Background: Williams Street Productions, LLC is a production sub-arm of Cartoon Network established in 1994 first under the name of Ghost Planet Industries to produce animated shows for the young-adult audience, also opening a small subsidiary as Williams Street West so that Matt Harrigan could work for Viacom International and Williams Street w...

  13. Ghost Planet Industries/Cartoon Network Productions (1996)

    Ghost Planet Industries/Cartoon Network Productions (1996) LogicSmash 78.1K subscribers 59K views 5 years ago The work captured here is presented under the Copyright Act law article titled "Fair...

  14. Williams Street

    Williams Street is a production company that is currently owned by the Warner Bros. Television Studios division of Warner Bros., a unit of Warner Bros. Discovery. It was formerly by Turner Broadcasting System. Williams Street was formerly known as Ghost Planet Industries after Space Ghost's show in 1994-1999. All of Adult Swim is produced by Williams Street. Keith Crofford oversees operations ...

  15. Ghost Planet Industries / Cartoon Network Productions (1997)

    Ghost Planet Industries / Cartoon Network Productions (1997) - YouTube 0:00 / 0:14 Ghost Planet Industries / Cartoon Network Productions (1997) PNL Logo Archive 1.06K subscribers 3.9K views 2...

  16. Space Ghost Coast to Coast

    Space Ghost Coast to Coast is an animated series for young and old. It was the first original Williams Street series, it was made when the company was known as Ghost Planet Industries. Not only is it the most extensive series made by the company, it is also the one with the most expansive mythology and history. It has had two spin-offs, several comic book series, cameos, and various references ...

  17. Williams Street

    Williams Street (formerly known as Ghost Planet Industries from 1994-1998, named after Space Ghost's home planet) is a division of Cartoon Network, which is owned by Turner Broadcasting, that created and programmed 4 programming blocks, Toonami, Miguzi, Saturday Video Entertainment System and Adult Swim. The studio is also responsible for co-producing most Adult Swim original series. Keith ...

  18. Williams Street

    Williams Street is a production company currently owned by Warner Bros. Television Studios. Williams Street was formerly known as Ghost Planet Industries after Space Ghost: Coast to Coast in 1994-1999. All Adult Swim content is produced by Williams Street. The two people who were primarily responsible for looking after the corporation were Mike Lazzo and Keith Crofford. Mike Lazzo and Keith ...

  19. Cartoon Planet (1995-1998) : Cartoon Network, Ghost Planet Industries

    Cartoon Planet (1995-1998) : Cartoon Network, Ghost Planet Industries : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive Volume 90% 00:00 22:31 22:31 1 Cartoon Planet 01 Planet of Doom 22:20 2 Cartoon Planet 02 Monkey Trouble 22:29 3 Cartoon Planet 03 Love That Brak! 22:15 4 Cartoon Planet 04 My Space Ghost the Car 22:18 5

  20. Williams Street

    Visuals: Same as the Ghost Planet Industries logo, except the text reads "WILLIAMS STREET" in a Futura-like font. Early Variant: Some early shows with the logo contain the letters farther apart (in a proper Futura font), the waving is bigger and it has a smoother and faster rate, and had better image quality. Trivia: This early logo variant was featured in an Adult Swim bump from 2010.

  21. Ghost Planet Industries, Cartoon Network Productions (1997)

    Ghost Planet Industries, Cartoon Network Productions (1997) Plasma Storm 45.9K subscribers Subscribe 4.4K views 3 years ago From The Space Ghost Coast To Coast Episode Brilliant Number One. The...

  22. Space Ghost Coast To Coast

    Cartoon Network, Ghost Planet Industries. Publication date 1994-11-04 Usage Attribution 4.0 International Topics space ghost, sgc2c, space ghost coast to coast, cartoon network, the mask, jim carrey Language English.

  23. Ghost Planet Industries

    Ghost Planet Industries. 15 likes. Williams Street (aka as Ghost Planet Industries (1994-1998), named after Space Ghost's home planet) is a division of Cartoon Network, which is owned by Turner...